Social inhibition in population-based and cardiac patient samples

Robustness of inhibition, sensitivity and withdrawal as distinct facets

Stefanie Duijndam*, Johan Denollet

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleScientificpeer-review

Abstract

Objective:
Behavioral inhibition plays a key role in animal stress research and developmental research in children. Therefore, we examined the robustness of our multifaceted model of adult social inhibition that comprises behavioral inhibition, interpersonal sensitivity, and social withdrawal components.
Method:
A total of 899 adults completed the 15-item Social Inhibition Questionnaire (SIQ15) and measures of emotional distress. Confirmatory Factor Analysis (CFA), reliability estimates, and correlational and second-order factor analyses were used to examine the robustness of our model.
Results:
CFA (RMSEA=.052; NFI=0.938; CFI=0.957) and Cronbach’s α estimates ≥.87 confirmed the robustness of our multi-facet social inhibition model based on three correlated inhibition, sensitivity, and withdrawal factors in 560 adults from the general population and in 194 undergraduate students. Inhibition, sensitivity, and withdrawal were stable over time (3-month test-retest correlations ≥.78), and were closely related to the Gest Behavioral Inhibition and PID-5 Withdrawal measures in a clinical sample of 145 cardiac patients. Of note, male cardiac patients reported more inhibition and withdrawal than female patients. Across samples, social inhibition was distinctly different from negative affectivity.
Conclusions: Our 3-facet model of inhibition, sensitivity and withdrawal was robust across samples, and may promote research on adult social inhibition in population-based and clinical studies.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)13-23
JournalGeneral Hospital Psychiatry: Psychiatry, Medicine and Primary Care
Volume58
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2019

Fingerprint

Statistical Factor Analysis
chemotactic factor inactivator
Surveys and Questionnaires

Keywords

  • ANXIETY DISORDER
  • BEHAVIORAL-INHIBITION
  • D PERSONALITY
  • INDIVIDUAL-DIFFERENCES
  • INFANT TEMPERAMENT
  • INTERPERSONAL SENSITIVITY
  • Mental health
  • NEGATIVE AFFECTIVITY
  • Personality
  • RISK-FACTORS
  • SELF-PRESENTATION
  • SIQ15
  • Social inhibition
  • Social stress
  • WISTAR-KYOTO

Cite this

@article{71cfca56ac684dd8a7412de11ab637bf,
title = "Social inhibition in population-based and cardiac patient samples: Robustness of inhibition, sensitivity and withdrawal as distinct facets",
abstract = "Objective: Behavioral inhibition plays a key role in animal stress research and developmental research in children. Therefore, we examined the robustness of our multifaceted model of adult social inhibition that comprises behavioral inhibition, interpersonal sensitivity, and social withdrawal components. Method: A total of 899 adults completed the 15-item Social Inhibition Questionnaire (SIQ15) and measures of emotional distress. Confirmatory Factor Analysis (CFA), reliability estimates, and correlational and second-order factor analyses were used to examine the robustness of our model.Results: CFA (RMSEA=.052; NFI=0.938; CFI=0.957) and Cronbach’s α estimates ≥.87 confirmed the robustness of our multi-facet social inhibition model based on three correlated inhibition, sensitivity, and withdrawal factors in 560 adults from the general population and in 194 undergraduate students. Inhibition, sensitivity, and withdrawal were stable over time (3-month test-retest correlations ≥.78), and were closely related to the Gest Behavioral Inhibition and PID-5 Withdrawal measures in a clinical sample of 145 cardiac patients. Of note, male cardiac patients reported more inhibition and withdrawal than female patients. Across samples, social inhibition was distinctly different from negative affectivity. Conclusions: Our 3-facet model of inhibition, sensitivity and withdrawal was robust across samples, and may promote research on adult social inhibition in population-based and clinical studies.",
keywords = "ANXIETY DISORDER, BEHAVIORAL-INHIBITION, D PERSONALITY, INDIVIDUAL-DIFFERENCES, INFANT TEMPERAMENT, INTERPERSONAL SENSITIVITY, Mental health, NEGATIVE AFFECTIVITY, Personality, RISK-FACTORS, SELF-PRESENTATION, SIQ15, Social inhibition, Social stress, WISTAR-KYOTO",
author = "Stefanie Duijndam and Johan Denollet",
year = "2019",
doi = "10.1016/j.genhosppsych.2019.02.004",
language = "English",
volume = "58",
pages = "13--23",
journal = "General Hospital Psychiatry: Psychiatry, Medicine and Primary Care",
issn = "0163-8343",
publisher = "Elsevier Inc.",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Social inhibition in population-based and cardiac patient samples

T2 - Robustness of inhibition, sensitivity and withdrawal as distinct facets

AU - Duijndam, Stefanie

AU - Denollet, Johan

PY - 2019

Y1 - 2019

N2 - Objective: Behavioral inhibition plays a key role in animal stress research and developmental research in children. Therefore, we examined the robustness of our multifaceted model of adult social inhibition that comprises behavioral inhibition, interpersonal sensitivity, and social withdrawal components. Method: A total of 899 adults completed the 15-item Social Inhibition Questionnaire (SIQ15) and measures of emotional distress. Confirmatory Factor Analysis (CFA), reliability estimates, and correlational and second-order factor analyses were used to examine the robustness of our model.Results: CFA (RMSEA=.052; NFI=0.938; CFI=0.957) and Cronbach’s α estimates ≥.87 confirmed the robustness of our multi-facet social inhibition model based on three correlated inhibition, sensitivity, and withdrawal factors in 560 adults from the general population and in 194 undergraduate students. Inhibition, sensitivity, and withdrawal were stable over time (3-month test-retest correlations ≥.78), and were closely related to the Gest Behavioral Inhibition and PID-5 Withdrawal measures in a clinical sample of 145 cardiac patients. Of note, male cardiac patients reported more inhibition and withdrawal than female patients. Across samples, social inhibition was distinctly different from negative affectivity. Conclusions: Our 3-facet model of inhibition, sensitivity and withdrawal was robust across samples, and may promote research on adult social inhibition in population-based and clinical studies.

AB - Objective: Behavioral inhibition plays a key role in animal stress research and developmental research in children. Therefore, we examined the robustness of our multifaceted model of adult social inhibition that comprises behavioral inhibition, interpersonal sensitivity, and social withdrawal components. Method: A total of 899 adults completed the 15-item Social Inhibition Questionnaire (SIQ15) and measures of emotional distress. Confirmatory Factor Analysis (CFA), reliability estimates, and correlational and second-order factor analyses were used to examine the robustness of our model.Results: CFA (RMSEA=.052; NFI=0.938; CFI=0.957) and Cronbach’s α estimates ≥.87 confirmed the robustness of our multi-facet social inhibition model based on three correlated inhibition, sensitivity, and withdrawal factors in 560 adults from the general population and in 194 undergraduate students. Inhibition, sensitivity, and withdrawal were stable over time (3-month test-retest correlations ≥.78), and were closely related to the Gest Behavioral Inhibition and PID-5 Withdrawal measures in a clinical sample of 145 cardiac patients. Of note, male cardiac patients reported more inhibition and withdrawal than female patients. Across samples, social inhibition was distinctly different from negative affectivity. Conclusions: Our 3-facet model of inhibition, sensitivity and withdrawal was robust across samples, and may promote research on adult social inhibition in population-based and clinical studies.

KW - ANXIETY DISORDER

KW - BEHAVIORAL-INHIBITION

KW - D PERSONALITY

KW - INDIVIDUAL-DIFFERENCES

KW - INFANT TEMPERAMENT

KW - INTERPERSONAL SENSITIVITY

KW - Mental health

KW - NEGATIVE AFFECTIVITY

KW - Personality

KW - RISK-FACTORS

KW - SELF-PRESENTATION

KW - SIQ15

KW - Social inhibition

KW - Social stress

KW - WISTAR-KYOTO

U2 - 10.1016/j.genhosppsych.2019.02.004

DO - 10.1016/j.genhosppsych.2019.02.004

M3 - Article

VL - 58

SP - 13

EP - 23

JO - General Hospital Psychiatry: Psychiatry, Medicine and Primary Care

JF - General Hospital Psychiatry: Psychiatry, Medicine and Primary Care

SN - 0163-8343

ER -