Social networks of people with mild intellectual disabilities

Characteristics, satisfaction, wishes and quality of life

A.E. van Asselt-Goverts, P.J.C.M. Embregts, A.H.C. Hendriks

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleScientificpeer-review

Abstract

Background
A supportive social network is crucial for facilitating social inclusion, which can, in turn, contribute to the quality of life (QOL) for people with intellectual disabilities (ID). In this study, we investigate how people with mild ID perceive their social networks and which network characteristics relate to satisfaction with the network and perceived QOL.

Method
Data were gathered from 33 young adults with a mild to borderline ID using structured questionnaires: the MSNA to map the social network, the IDQOL‐16 to assess QOL, and a questionnaire to determine satisfaction and wishes with regard to the social network.

Results
The majority of the participants (73.1%) were satisfied with their social networks. Improvement in the area of strengthening existing ties (e.g. more frequent contact, better contact) was desired as opposed to expansion of the network. Affection – especially towards family and professionals – was most strongly related to perceived QOL. It appears to be essential that relatives live in the same town, can frequently meet up and provide both emotional and practical support.

Conclusions
The significance of family and the importance of high‐quality interpersonal relationships between professional and client in the lives of young adults with ID cannot be overestimated. Although measures of satisfaction and wishes can have limitations, in actual practice it is considered useful to assess the opinions of clients with respect to their social networks. Interventions can then be tailored to the needs and wishes of the persons themselves.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)450–461
JournalJournal of Intellectual Disability Research
Volume59
Issue number5
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2015

Fingerprint

Young Adult
Disabled Persons
Intellectual Disability
Quality of Life
Wishes
Social Networks
Young Adults
Questionnaire
Surveys and Questionnaires
Affection
Emotion
Social Inclusion
Person
Interpersonal Relationships
Strengthening

Cite this

@article{b8719f32a81e42da8a8f3db3fd1ae3e1,
title = "Social networks of people with mild intellectual disabilities: Characteristics, satisfaction, wishes and quality of life",
abstract = "BackgroundA supportive social network is crucial for facilitating social inclusion, which can, in turn, contribute to the quality of life (QOL) for people with intellectual disabilities (ID). In this study, we investigate how people with mild ID perceive their social networks and which network characteristics relate to satisfaction with the network and perceived QOL.MethodData were gathered from 33 young adults with a mild to borderline ID using structured questionnaires: the MSNA to map the social network, the IDQOL‐16 to assess QOL, and a questionnaire to determine satisfaction and wishes with regard to the social network.ResultsThe majority of the participants (73.1{\%}) were satisfied with their social networks. Improvement in the area of strengthening existing ties (e.g. more frequent contact, better contact) was desired as opposed to expansion of the network. Affection – especially towards family and professionals – was most strongly related to perceived QOL. It appears to be essential that relatives live in the same town, can frequently meet up and provide both emotional and practical support.ConclusionsThe significance of family and the importance of high‐quality interpersonal relationships between professional and client in the lives of young adults with ID cannot be overestimated. Although measures of satisfaction and wishes can have limitations, in actual practice it is considered useful to assess the opinions of clients with respect to their social networks. Interventions can then be tailored to the needs and wishes of the persons themselves.",
author = "{van Asselt-Goverts}, A.E. and P.J.C.M. Embregts and A.H.C. Hendriks",
year = "2015",
doi = "10.1111/jir.12143",
language = "English",
volume = "59",
pages = "450–461",
journal = "Journal of Intellectual Disability Research",
issn = "0964-2633",
publisher = "Wiley-Blackwell",
number = "5",

}

Social networks of people with mild intellectual disabilities : Characteristics, satisfaction, wishes and quality of life. / van Asselt-Goverts, A.E.; Embregts, P.J.C.M.; Hendriks, A.H.C.

In: Journal of Intellectual Disability Research, Vol. 59, No. 5, 2015, p. 450–461.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleScientificpeer-review

TY - JOUR

T1 - Social networks of people with mild intellectual disabilities

T2 - Characteristics, satisfaction, wishes and quality of life

AU - van Asselt-Goverts, A.E.

AU - Embregts, P.J.C.M.

AU - Hendriks, A.H.C.

PY - 2015

Y1 - 2015

N2 - BackgroundA supportive social network is crucial for facilitating social inclusion, which can, in turn, contribute to the quality of life (QOL) for people with intellectual disabilities (ID). In this study, we investigate how people with mild ID perceive their social networks and which network characteristics relate to satisfaction with the network and perceived QOL.MethodData were gathered from 33 young adults with a mild to borderline ID using structured questionnaires: the MSNA to map the social network, the IDQOL‐16 to assess QOL, and a questionnaire to determine satisfaction and wishes with regard to the social network.ResultsThe majority of the participants (73.1%) were satisfied with their social networks. Improvement in the area of strengthening existing ties (e.g. more frequent contact, better contact) was desired as opposed to expansion of the network. Affection – especially towards family and professionals – was most strongly related to perceived QOL. It appears to be essential that relatives live in the same town, can frequently meet up and provide both emotional and practical support.ConclusionsThe significance of family and the importance of high‐quality interpersonal relationships between professional and client in the lives of young adults with ID cannot be overestimated. Although measures of satisfaction and wishes can have limitations, in actual practice it is considered useful to assess the opinions of clients with respect to their social networks. Interventions can then be tailored to the needs and wishes of the persons themselves.

AB - BackgroundA supportive social network is crucial for facilitating social inclusion, which can, in turn, contribute to the quality of life (QOL) for people with intellectual disabilities (ID). In this study, we investigate how people with mild ID perceive their social networks and which network characteristics relate to satisfaction with the network and perceived QOL.MethodData were gathered from 33 young adults with a mild to borderline ID using structured questionnaires: the MSNA to map the social network, the IDQOL‐16 to assess QOL, and a questionnaire to determine satisfaction and wishes with regard to the social network.ResultsThe majority of the participants (73.1%) were satisfied with their social networks. Improvement in the area of strengthening existing ties (e.g. more frequent contact, better contact) was desired as opposed to expansion of the network. Affection – especially towards family and professionals – was most strongly related to perceived QOL. It appears to be essential that relatives live in the same town, can frequently meet up and provide both emotional and practical support.ConclusionsThe significance of family and the importance of high‐quality interpersonal relationships between professional and client in the lives of young adults with ID cannot be overestimated. Although measures of satisfaction and wishes can have limitations, in actual practice it is considered useful to assess the opinions of clients with respect to their social networks. Interventions can then be tailored to the needs and wishes of the persons themselves.

U2 - 10.1111/jir.12143

DO - 10.1111/jir.12143

M3 - Article

VL - 59

SP - 450

EP - 461

JO - Journal of Intellectual Disability Research

JF - Journal of Intellectual Disability Research

SN - 0964-2633

IS - 5

ER -