Sociodemographic and medical determinants of quality of life in long-term childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia survivors enrolled in EORTC CLG studies

European Organisation Res Treatme, Childrens Leukemia Grp CLG, Charlotte Sleurs, Jammbe Musoro, Ali Rowsell, Michal Kicinski, Stefan Suciu, Sofia Chantziara, Corneel Coens, Madeline Pe, Pierre Missotten, Els Vandecruys, Anne Uyttebroeck, Marie-Francoise Dresse, Claire Pluchart, Alina Ferster, Claire Freycon, Jutte van der Werff ten Bosch, Pierre-Simon Rohrlich, Yves BenoitAnne-Sophie Darlington, Caroline Piette*

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleScientificpeer-review

6 Citations (Scopus)
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Abstract

Simple Summary Long-term quality of life and its potential risk factors in childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) patients remain uncertain. In this cross-sectional study, we investigated daily life quality and life challenges in adult survivors of ALL using multiple self-report questionnaires. Furthermore, risk factors, including gender, age at diagnosis, relapse/second neoplasm, risk group, and cranial radiotherapy, were explored in detail. Younger, female, and relapsed patients appeared to encounter more life challenges, while physical challenges occurred more often in relapsed and high-risk patients. More positive effects on socializing were found in the older patients compared to younger patients. This study provides important information for individual and specialized support. Background: due to increasing survival rates in childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL), the number of survivors has been expanding. A significant proportion of these survivors can experience long-term emotional and psychosocial problems. However, the exact risk factors remain inconclusive. We investigated potential risk factors for decreased daily life quality and life challenges in long-term childhood ALL survivors enrolled between 1971 and 1998 in EORTC studies. Methods: self-report questionnaires were collected from 186 survivors (109 females; mean age at diagnosis 5.62 years, range 0.2-14.7; median time since diagnosis of 20.5 years (12.9-41.6)), including the Short-Form Health Survey (SF-12) and Impact of Cancer-Childhood Survivors (IOC-CS). Multivariable linear regression models were used to assess the impact of gender, age at diagnosis, relapse/second neoplasm, National Cancer Institute (NCI) risk group and cranial radiotherapy on 2 subscales of the SF-12 (physical and mental health) and five subscales of the IOC-CS (life challenges, body and health, personal growth, thinking and memory problems and socializing). Results: mental component scores of SF-12 were not significantly associated with any risk factor. Physical component scores were lower in relapsed, irradiated and NCI high-risk patients. Regarding IOC-CS negative impact subscales, life challenges was more negatively impacted by cancer in female, younger (i.e., 6 years). Conclusions: this study demonstrates that long-term outcomes can be both adverse and positive, depending on the patient's demographic and clinical characteristics. Younger, female, and relapsed patients might encounter more life challenges years after their disease, while physical challenges could occur more often in relapsed and high-risk patients. Finally, the positive effect on socializing in the older patients sheds new light on the importance of peer interactions for this subgroup. Specific individual challenges thus need specialized support for specific subgroups.

Original languageEnglish
Article number152
Number of pages13
JournalCancers
Volume14
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2022

Keywords

  • acute lymphoblastic leukemia
  • quality of life
  • long-term survivorship
  • YOUNG-ADULT SURVIVORS
  • POSTTRAUMATIC GROWTH
  • HEALTH-STATUS
  • CANCER
  • OUTCOMES
  • CHILDREN
  • IMPACT
  • DEPRESSION

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