Stigma research in the field of intellectual disabilities

A scoping review on the perspective of care providers

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Abstract

Objectives:
Care providers are key agents in the lives of individuals with an intellectual disability (ID). The quality of their support can be affected by manifestations of stigma. This scoping review was conducted to explore studies that provide indications of care providers’ stigmatization of people with ID.

Methods:
A structured search was made in four databases to identify relevant studies in English-language peer-reviewed journals. Records were systematically and independently screened by the researchers.

Results:
The 40 articles included in this review were mainly conducted in Western countries and used Likert-type self-report measures of explicit attitudes. Stigmatization seemed more distinct concerning people with high support needs. The few studies on public stigma preliminary suggest that staff may also stigmatize people with ID based on other social identities. Regarding the support of structural stigma, staff reported skepticism regarding community inclusion for people with high support needs, and tended to be ambivalent about the protection-or-empowerment balance in the support of people with ID. Possible indications of stigmatization regarding sexuality were found on specific issues, such as self-determination and privacy. Agreement of staff with certain rights did not necessarily lead to staff acting in accordance with such rights.

Conclusion:
Indications of stigmatization of people with ID by care providers were found. Stigmatizing attitudes might affect the quality of care providers’ support. Potential leads for future interventions concern creating awareness, sharing power, addressing diagnostic overshadowing, and providing explicit policy translations. Directions for future research concern strengthening the methodology of studies and enriching the studied topics.
Original languageEnglish
Number of pages20
JournalInternational Journal of Developmental Disabilities
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2019

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Disabled Persons
Personal Autonomy
Privacy
Self Report
Language
Databases

Keywords

  • AGENCY STAFF
  • ATTITUDES
  • COMMUNITY LIVING STAFF
  • DIRECT SUPPORT PROFESSIONALS
  • HEALTH-PROFESSIONALS
  • LEARNING-DISABILITIES
  • MENTAL-ILLNESS
  • PEOPLE
  • SERVICE-PROVIDERS
  • SOCIAL NETWORKS
  • attitudes
  • care providers
  • intellectual disability
  • review
  • stigma
  • support staff

Cite this

@article{154a8adf055144b881b2d2d84158d780,
title = "Stigma research in the field of intellectual disabilities: A scoping review on the perspective of care providers",
abstract = "Objectives: Care providers are key agents in the lives of individuals with an intellectual disability (ID). The quality of their support can be affected by manifestations of stigma. This scoping review was conducted to explore studies that provide indications of care providers’ stigmatization of people with ID. Methods: A structured search was made in four databases to identify relevant studies in English-language peer-reviewed journals. Records were systematically and independently screened by the researchers. Results: The 40 articles included in this review were mainly conducted in Western countries and used Likert-type self-report measures of explicit attitudes. Stigmatization seemed more distinct concerning people with high support needs. The few studies on public stigma preliminary suggest that staff may also stigmatize people with ID based on other social identities. Regarding the support of structural stigma, staff reported skepticism regarding community inclusion for people with high support needs, and tended to be ambivalent about the protection-or-empowerment balance in the support of people with ID. Possible indications of stigmatization regarding sexuality were found on specific issues, such as self-determination and privacy. Agreement of staff with certain rights did not necessarily lead to staff acting in accordance with such rights. Conclusion: Indications of stigmatization of people with ID by care providers were found. Stigmatizing attitudes might affect the quality of care providers’ support. Potential leads for future interventions concern creating awareness, sharing power, addressing diagnostic overshadowing, and providing explicit policy translations. Directions for future research concern strengthening the methodology of studies and enriching the studied topics.",
keywords = "AGENCY STAFF, ATTITUDES, COMMUNITY LIVING STAFF, DIRECT SUPPORT PROFESSIONALS, HEALTH-PROFESSIONALS, LEARNING-DISABILITIES, MENTAL-ILLNESS, PEOPLE, SERVICE-PROVIDERS, SOCIAL NETWORKS, attitudes, care providers, intellectual disability, review, stigma, support staff",
author = "H.A. Pelleboer-Gunnink and {van Oorsouw}, W.M.W.J. and {van Weeghel}, J. and P.J.C.M. Embregts",
year = "2019",
doi = "10.1080/20473869.2019.1616990",
language = "English",
journal = "International Journal of Developmental Disabilities",
issn = "2047-3869",
publisher = "Maney Publishing",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Stigma research in the field of intellectual disabilities

T2 - A scoping review on the perspective of care providers

AU - Pelleboer-Gunnink, H.A.

AU - van Oorsouw, W.M.W.J.

AU - van Weeghel, J.

AU - Embregts, P.J.C.M.

PY - 2019

Y1 - 2019

N2 - Objectives: Care providers are key agents in the lives of individuals with an intellectual disability (ID). The quality of their support can be affected by manifestations of stigma. This scoping review was conducted to explore studies that provide indications of care providers’ stigmatization of people with ID. Methods: A structured search was made in four databases to identify relevant studies in English-language peer-reviewed journals. Records were systematically and independently screened by the researchers. Results: The 40 articles included in this review were mainly conducted in Western countries and used Likert-type self-report measures of explicit attitudes. Stigmatization seemed more distinct concerning people with high support needs. The few studies on public stigma preliminary suggest that staff may also stigmatize people with ID based on other social identities. Regarding the support of structural stigma, staff reported skepticism regarding community inclusion for people with high support needs, and tended to be ambivalent about the protection-or-empowerment balance in the support of people with ID. Possible indications of stigmatization regarding sexuality were found on specific issues, such as self-determination and privacy. Agreement of staff with certain rights did not necessarily lead to staff acting in accordance with such rights. Conclusion: Indications of stigmatization of people with ID by care providers were found. Stigmatizing attitudes might affect the quality of care providers’ support. Potential leads for future interventions concern creating awareness, sharing power, addressing diagnostic overshadowing, and providing explicit policy translations. Directions for future research concern strengthening the methodology of studies and enriching the studied topics.

AB - Objectives: Care providers are key agents in the lives of individuals with an intellectual disability (ID). The quality of their support can be affected by manifestations of stigma. This scoping review was conducted to explore studies that provide indications of care providers’ stigmatization of people with ID. Methods: A structured search was made in four databases to identify relevant studies in English-language peer-reviewed journals. Records were systematically and independently screened by the researchers. Results: The 40 articles included in this review were mainly conducted in Western countries and used Likert-type self-report measures of explicit attitudes. Stigmatization seemed more distinct concerning people with high support needs. The few studies on public stigma preliminary suggest that staff may also stigmatize people with ID based on other social identities. Regarding the support of structural stigma, staff reported skepticism regarding community inclusion for people with high support needs, and tended to be ambivalent about the protection-or-empowerment balance in the support of people with ID. Possible indications of stigmatization regarding sexuality were found on specific issues, such as self-determination and privacy. Agreement of staff with certain rights did not necessarily lead to staff acting in accordance with such rights. Conclusion: Indications of stigmatization of people with ID by care providers were found. Stigmatizing attitudes might affect the quality of care providers’ support. Potential leads for future interventions concern creating awareness, sharing power, addressing diagnostic overshadowing, and providing explicit policy translations. Directions for future research concern strengthening the methodology of studies and enriching the studied topics.

KW - AGENCY STAFF

KW - ATTITUDES

KW - COMMUNITY LIVING STAFF

KW - DIRECT SUPPORT PROFESSIONALS

KW - HEALTH-PROFESSIONALS

KW - LEARNING-DISABILITIES

KW - MENTAL-ILLNESS

KW - PEOPLE

KW - SERVICE-PROVIDERS

KW - SOCIAL NETWORKS

KW - attitudes

KW - care providers

KW - intellectual disability

KW - review

KW - stigma

KW - support staff

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U2 - 10.1080/20473869.2019.1616990

DO - 10.1080/20473869.2019.1616990

M3 - Review article

JO - International Journal of Developmental Disabilities

JF - International Journal of Developmental Disabilities

SN - 2047-3869

ER -