Strengthening parental self-efficacy and resilience: A within-subject experimental study with refugee parents of adolescents

Hend Eltanamly*, Patty Leijten, Eeske van Roekel, Benedicte Mouton, Michael Pluess, Geertjan Overbeek

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleScientificpeer-review

3 Citations (Scopus)
195 Downloads (Pure)

Abstract

Post-migration stress and parenting adolescents can reduce parental self-efficacy. This study tested the effects of strengthening parental self-efficacy in refugee parents of adolescents and whether this makes parental self-efficacy less impacted by post-migration stressors. Using a within-subject experimental design, experience sampling data were collected in 2019 from 53 refugee parents of adolescents (Mage = 39.7, SDage = 5.59, 73% Syrian, 70% mothers) in the Netherlands. Data were analyzed by dynamic structural equation modeling using interrupted time-series analysis. The single-session personalized intervention strengthened parental self-efficacy (small effect: between case standardized mean difference = 0.09) and made refugee parents less vulnerable to post-migration stressors. Findings suggest that parental self-efficacy is malleable and strengthening it fosters refugee parents' resilience. Replications with longer-term follow-ups are needed.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)187-201
JournalChild Development
Volume94
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2023

Keywords

  • AMERICAN
  • ASSOCIATIONS
  • AUTONOMY
  • COMPETENCE
  • DECISION
  • FAMILIES
  • FEASIBILITY
  • INTERVENTION
  • RECOVERY
  • SOCIAL COGNITIVE THEORY

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