Subjective cognitive functioning in patients with a meningioma: Its course and association with objective cognitive functioning and psychological symptoms

Pearl J C van Lonkhuizen, Sophie J M Rijnen, Sophie D van der Linden, Geert-Jan M Rutten, Karin Gehring*, Margriet M Sitskoorn

*Corresponding author for this work

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Abstract

Objective: 

Although meningioma patients show deficits in objective cognitive functioning (OCF) measured with neuropsychological tests, subjective cognitive functioning (SCF) has received little attention. We investigate SCF from pre- to post-surgery and its associations with OCF, psychological, sociodemographic, and clinical characteristics.

Methods: 

SCF was measured using the Cognitive Failures Questionnaire (CFQ) one day before (T0), and three (T3) and twelve months (T12) after surgery. Patients' scores were compared to normative data and changes over time were assessed. The neuropsychological battery CNS Vital Signs and the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale were administered. Correlations of SCF with OCF, psychological, sociodemographic, and clinical characteristics were explored.

Results: 

Patients reported significantly better SCF as compared with controls at T0 (N=54) and T3 (N=242), but not at T12 (N=50). A significant decrease in group level SCF was observed from T0 to T12 (n=24, p<.001). SCF was associated with anxiety at all time points (rs=-0.543 to -0.352) and with depression at T3 and T12 (r=-0.338 and -0.574), but not with OCF, sociodemographic, or clinical characteristics (rs=-0.202 to 0.288).

Conclusions: 

Meningioma patients experienced better SCF as compared to controls before and three months after surgery, which might be the result of phenomena related to disease and recovery. As the findings suggest that cognitive symptoms might increase later on, future studies should further investigate the course of SCF in meningioma patients. In clinical practice, measurements of SCF should be combined with those of OCF and psychological distress in order to determine whether and which interventions are needed.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1654-1662
JournalPsycho-Oncology
Volume28
Issue number8
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2019

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Meningioma
Depression
Vital Signs

Keywords

  • COMPLAINTS
  • FAILURES
  • HOSPITAL ANXIETY
  • QUALITY-OF-LIFE
  • VALIDITY
  • brain neoplasms
  • cancer
  • cognition
  • meningeal neoplasms
  • neuropsychological tests
  • neurosurgery
  • oncology
  • patient reported outcome measures

Cite this

@article{5485569c2a43421a992d871e968e5640,
title = "Subjective cognitive functioning in patients with a meningioma: Its course and association with objective cognitive functioning and psychological symptoms",
abstract = "Objective: Although meningioma patients show deficits in objective cognitive functioning (OCF) measured with neuropsychological tests, subjective cognitive functioning (SCF) has received little attention. We investigate SCF from pre- to post-surgery and its associations with OCF, psychological, sociodemographic, and clinical characteristics.Methods: SCF was measured using the Cognitive Failures Questionnaire (CFQ) one day before (T0), and three (T3) and twelve months (T12) after surgery. Patients' scores were compared to normative data and changes over time were assessed. The neuropsychological battery CNS Vital Signs and the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale were administered. Correlations of SCF with OCF, psychological, sociodemographic, and clinical characteristics were explored.Results: Patients reported significantly better SCF as compared with controls at T0 (N=54) and T3 (N=242), but not at T12 (N=50). A significant decrease in group level SCF was observed from T0 to T12 (n=24, p<.001). SCF was associated with anxiety at all time points (rs=-0.543 to -0.352) and with depression at T3 and T12 (r=-0.338 and -0.574), but not with OCF, sociodemographic, or clinical characteristics (rs=-0.202 to 0.288).Conclusions: Meningioma patients experienced better SCF as compared to controls before and three months after surgery, which might be the result of phenomena related to disease and recovery. As the findings suggest that cognitive symptoms might increase later on, future studies should further investigate the course of SCF in meningioma patients. In clinical practice, measurements of SCF should be combined with those of OCF and psychological distress in order to determine whether and which interventions are needed.",
keywords = "COMPLAINTS, FAILURES, HOSPITAL ANXIETY, QUALITY-OF-LIFE, VALIDITY, brain neoplasms, cancer, cognition, meningeal neoplasms, neuropsychological tests, neurosurgery, oncology, patient reported outcome measures",
author = "{van Lonkhuizen}, {Pearl J C} and Rijnen, {Sophie J M} and {van der Linden}, {Sophie D} and Rutten, {Geert-Jan M} and Karin Gehring and Sitskoorn, {Margriet M}",
note = "This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.",
year = "2019",
doi = "10.1002/pon.5136",
language = "English",
volume = "28",
pages = "1654--1662",
journal = "Psycho-Oncology",
issn = "1057-9249",
publisher = "Wiley",
number = "8",

}

Subjective cognitive functioning in patients with a meningioma : Its course and association with objective cognitive functioning and psychological symptoms. / van Lonkhuizen, Pearl J C; Rijnen, Sophie J M; van der Linden, Sophie D; Rutten, Geert-Jan M; Gehring, Karin; Sitskoorn, Margriet M.

In: Psycho-Oncology, Vol. 28, No. 8, 2019, p. 1654-1662.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleScientificpeer-review

TY - JOUR

T1 - Subjective cognitive functioning in patients with a meningioma

T2 - Its course and association with objective cognitive functioning and psychological symptoms

AU - van Lonkhuizen, Pearl J C

AU - Rijnen, Sophie J M

AU - van der Linden, Sophie D

AU - Rutten, Geert-Jan M

AU - Gehring, Karin

AU - Sitskoorn, Margriet M

N1 - This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

PY - 2019

Y1 - 2019

N2 - Objective: Although meningioma patients show deficits in objective cognitive functioning (OCF) measured with neuropsychological tests, subjective cognitive functioning (SCF) has received little attention. We investigate SCF from pre- to post-surgery and its associations with OCF, psychological, sociodemographic, and clinical characteristics.Methods: SCF was measured using the Cognitive Failures Questionnaire (CFQ) one day before (T0), and three (T3) and twelve months (T12) after surgery. Patients' scores were compared to normative data and changes over time were assessed. The neuropsychological battery CNS Vital Signs and the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale were administered. Correlations of SCF with OCF, psychological, sociodemographic, and clinical characteristics were explored.Results: Patients reported significantly better SCF as compared with controls at T0 (N=54) and T3 (N=242), but not at T12 (N=50). A significant decrease in group level SCF was observed from T0 to T12 (n=24, p<.001). SCF was associated with anxiety at all time points (rs=-0.543 to -0.352) and with depression at T3 and T12 (r=-0.338 and -0.574), but not with OCF, sociodemographic, or clinical characteristics (rs=-0.202 to 0.288).Conclusions: Meningioma patients experienced better SCF as compared to controls before and three months after surgery, which might be the result of phenomena related to disease and recovery. As the findings suggest that cognitive symptoms might increase later on, future studies should further investigate the course of SCF in meningioma patients. In clinical practice, measurements of SCF should be combined with those of OCF and psychological distress in order to determine whether and which interventions are needed.

AB - Objective: Although meningioma patients show deficits in objective cognitive functioning (OCF) measured with neuropsychological tests, subjective cognitive functioning (SCF) has received little attention. We investigate SCF from pre- to post-surgery and its associations with OCF, psychological, sociodemographic, and clinical characteristics.Methods: SCF was measured using the Cognitive Failures Questionnaire (CFQ) one day before (T0), and three (T3) and twelve months (T12) after surgery. Patients' scores were compared to normative data and changes over time were assessed. The neuropsychological battery CNS Vital Signs and the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale were administered. Correlations of SCF with OCF, psychological, sociodemographic, and clinical characteristics were explored.Results: Patients reported significantly better SCF as compared with controls at T0 (N=54) and T3 (N=242), but not at T12 (N=50). A significant decrease in group level SCF was observed from T0 to T12 (n=24, p<.001). SCF was associated with anxiety at all time points (rs=-0.543 to -0.352) and with depression at T3 and T12 (r=-0.338 and -0.574), but not with OCF, sociodemographic, or clinical characteristics (rs=-0.202 to 0.288).Conclusions: Meningioma patients experienced better SCF as compared to controls before and three months after surgery, which might be the result of phenomena related to disease and recovery. As the findings suggest that cognitive symptoms might increase later on, future studies should further investigate the course of SCF in meningioma patients. In clinical practice, measurements of SCF should be combined with those of OCF and psychological distress in order to determine whether and which interventions are needed.

KW - COMPLAINTS

KW - FAILURES

KW - HOSPITAL ANXIETY

KW - QUALITY-OF-LIFE

KW - VALIDITY

KW - brain neoplasms

KW - cancer

KW - cognition

KW - meningeal neoplasms

KW - neuropsychological tests

KW - neurosurgery

KW - oncology

KW - patient reported outcome measures

U2 - 10.1002/pon.5136

DO - 10.1002/pon.5136

M3 - Article

C2 - 31141624

VL - 28

SP - 1654

EP - 1662

JO - Psycho-Oncology

JF - Psycho-Oncology

SN - 1057-9249

IS - 8

ER -