Substance use and misuse of older adults living in residential care facilities: A scoping review from a person-centred care approach

L. I. de Graaf*, M. M. Janssen, T. S. M. Roelofs, K. G. Luijkx

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleScientificpeer-review

Abstract

Person-centred care (PCC) in residential care facilities (RCFs) is valuable but creates challenges for care professionals balancing involvement and a partnership approach for residents while considering the health and safety outcomes of all residents. This review evaluates what is known about the substance use and misuse of residents living in RCFs and what is important to study in future research to enhance PCC, especially in cases in which residents wish to choose unhealthy behaviours. A scoping review was conducted and exclusion criteria were set. The included papers were assessed on methodological quality using the Mixed Methods Appraisal Tool and the results were qualitatively analysed. The included papers consisted of studies regarding alcohol, tobacco and illicit drugs. The results showed that care professionals are involved in facilitating and regulating alcohol and tobacco. The focus of the included papers is on alcohol and tobacco. Five of the 16 papers assessed the residents’ perspective. This review highlights the importance of incorporating the perspectives of residents, care professionals and the organisation to enhance PCC and enable residents to make shared and well-informed decisions in dialogue with care professionals. Future research should also assess the distinction between substance use and misuse, and how this affects implementing PCC in RCFs.
Original languageEnglish
JournalAgeing & Society
DOIs
Publication statusE-pub ahead of print - 2021

Keywords

  • long-term care
  • nursing home residents
  • substance misuse
  • substance use

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