Suicide ideation among high-risk adolescent females

Examining the interplay between parasympathetic regulation and friendship support

M. Giletta, Paul D. Hastings, Karen D. Rudolph, Daniel J. Bauer, Matthew K. Nock, Mitchell J. Prinstein

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleScientificpeer-review

Abstract

Poor physiological self-regulation has been proposed as a potential biological vulnerability for adolescent suicidality. This study tested this hypothesis by examining the effect of parasympathetic stress responses on future suicide ideation. In addition, drawing from multilevel developmental psychopathology theories, the interplay between parasympathetic regulation and friendship support, conceptualized as an external source of regulation, was examined. At baseline, 132 adolescent females (M age = 14.59, SD = 1.39) with a history of mental health concerns participated in an in vivo interpersonal stressor (a laboratory speech task) and completed self-report measures of depressive symptoms and perceived support within a close same-age female friendship. Respiratory sinus arrhythmia (RSA) was measured before and during the speech task. Suicide ideation was assessed at baseline and at 3, 6, and 9 months follow-up. The results revealed that females with greater relative RSA decreases to the laboratory stressor were at higher risk for reporting suicide ideation over the subsequent 9 months. Moreover, parasympathetic responses moderated the effect of friendship support on suicide ideation; among females with mild changes or higher relative increases in RSA, but not more pronounced RSA decreases, friendship support reduced risk for future suicide ideation. Findings highlight the crucial role of physiological and external regulation sources as protective factors for youth suicidality.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1161-1175
JournalDevelopment and Psychopathology
Volume29
Issue number4
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Oct 2017

Keywords

  • RESPIRATORY SINUS ARRHYTHMIA
  • SELF-INJURIOUS THOUGHTS
  • HEART-RATE REACTIVITY
  • INDIVIDUAL-DIFFERENCES
  • DIFFERENTIAL SUSCEPTIBILITY
  • EMOTION REGULATION
  • STRESS REACTIVITY
  • BIOLOGICAL SENSITIVITY
  • INTERNALIZING SYMPTOMS
  • DEPRESSIVE SYMPTOMS

Cite this

Giletta, M. ; Hastings, Paul D. ; Rudolph, Karen D. ; Bauer, Daniel J. ; Nock, Matthew K. ; Prinstein, Mitchell J. / Suicide ideation among high-risk adolescent females : Examining the interplay between parasympathetic regulation and friendship support. In: Development and Psychopathology. 2017 ; Vol. 29, No. 4. pp. 1161-1175.
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abstract = "Poor physiological self-regulation has been proposed as a potential biological vulnerability for adolescent suicidality. This study tested this hypothesis by examining the effect of parasympathetic stress responses on future suicide ideation. In addition, drawing from multilevel developmental psychopathology theories, the interplay between parasympathetic regulation and friendship support, conceptualized as an external source of regulation, was examined. At baseline, 132 adolescent females (M age = 14.59, SD = 1.39) with a history of mental health concerns participated in an in vivo interpersonal stressor (a laboratory speech task) and completed self-report measures of depressive symptoms and perceived support within a close same-age female friendship. Respiratory sinus arrhythmia (RSA) was measured before and during the speech task. Suicide ideation was assessed at baseline and at 3, 6, and 9 months follow-up. The results revealed that females with greater relative RSA decreases to the laboratory stressor were at higher risk for reporting suicide ideation over the subsequent 9 months. Moreover, parasympathetic responses moderated the effect of friendship support on suicide ideation; among females with mild changes or higher relative increases in RSA, but not more pronounced RSA decreases, friendship support reduced risk for future suicide ideation. Findings highlight the crucial role of physiological and external regulation sources as protective factors for youth suicidality.",
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Suicide ideation among high-risk adolescent females : Examining the interplay between parasympathetic regulation and friendship support. / Giletta, M.; Hastings, Paul D.; Rudolph, Karen D.; Bauer, Daniel J.; Nock, Matthew K.; Prinstein, Mitchell J.

In: Development and Psychopathology, Vol. 29, No. 4, 10.2017, p. 1161-1175.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleScientificpeer-review

TY - JOUR

T1 - Suicide ideation among high-risk adolescent females

T2 - Examining the interplay between parasympathetic regulation and friendship support

AU - Giletta, M.

AU - Hastings, Paul D.

AU - Rudolph, Karen D.

AU - Bauer, Daniel J.

AU - Nock, Matthew K.

AU - Prinstein, Mitchell J.

PY - 2017/10

Y1 - 2017/10

N2 - Poor physiological self-regulation has been proposed as a potential biological vulnerability for adolescent suicidality. This study tested this hypothesis by examining the effect of parasympathetic stress responses on future suicide ideation. In addition, drawing from multilevel developmental psychopathology theories, the interplay between parasympathetic regulation and friendship support, conceptualized as an external source of regulation, was examined. At baseline, 132 adolescent females (M age = 14.59, SD = 1.39) with a history of mental health concerns participated in an in vivo interpersonal stressor (a laboratory speech task) and completed self-report measures of depressive symptoms and perceived support within a close same-age female friendship. Respiratory sinus arrhythmia (RSA) was measured before and during the speech task. Suicide ideation was assessed at baseline and at 3, 6, and 9 months follow-up. The results revealed that females with greater relative RSA decreases to the laboratory stressor were at higher risk for reporting suicide ideation over the subsequent 9 months. Moreover, parasympathetic responses moderated the effect of friendship support on suicide ideation; among females with mild changes or higher relative increases in RSA, but not more pronounced RSA decreases, friendship support reduced risk for future suicide ideation. Findings highlight the crucial role of physiological and external regulation sources as protective factors for youth suicidality.

AB - Poor physiological self-regulation has been proposed as a potential biological vulnerability for adolescent suicidality. This study tested this hypothesis by examining the effect of parasympathetic stress responses on future suicide ideation. In addition, drawing from multilevel developmental psychopathology theories, the interplay between parasympathetic regulation and friendship support, conceptualized as an external source of regulation, was examined. At baseline, 132 adolescent females (M age = 14.59, SD = 1.39) with a history of mental health concerns participated in an in vivo interpersonal stressor (a laboratory speech task) and completed self-report measures of depressive symptoms and perceived support within a close same-age female friendship. Respiratory sinus arrhythmia (RSA) was measured before and during the speech task. Suicide ideation was assessed at baseline and at 3, 6, and 9 months follow-up. The results revealed that females with greater relative RSA decreases to the laboratory stressor were at higher risk for reporting suicide ideation over the subsequent 9 months. Moreover, parasympathetic responses moderated the effect of friendship support on suicide ideation; among females with mild changes or higher relative increases in RSA, but not more pronounced RSA decreases, friendship support reduced risk for future suicide ideation. Findings highlight the crucial role of physiological and external regulation sources as protective factors for youth suicidality.

KW - RESPIRATORY SINUS ARRHYTHMIA

KW - SELF-INJURIOUS THOUGHTS

KW - HEART-RATE REACTIVITY

KW - INDIVIDUAL-DIFFERENCES

KW - DIFFERENTIAL SUSCEPTIBILITY

KW - EMOTION REGULATION

KW - STRESS REACTIVITY

KW - BIOLOGICAL SENSITIVITY

KW - INTERNALIZING SYMPTOMS

KW - DEPRESSIVE SYMPTOMS

U2 - 10.1017/S0954579416001218

DO - 10.1017/S0954579416001218

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JO - Development and Psychopathology

JF - Development and Psychopathology

SN - 0954-5794

IS - 4

ER -