Supervisory alliance: Key to positive alliances and outcomes in home-based parenting support?

M. de Greef, M. J. M. H. Delsing, B. D. McLeod, H. M. Pijnenburg, R. H. J. Scholte, J. van Vugt, M. J. C. van Hattum

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleScientificpeer-review

Abstract

ObjectivesThis study investigated whether the supervisory alliance between professionals and supervisors contributes to strong client-professional alliances and positive outcomes of home-based parenting support provided by youth care organizations.MethodsMulti-informant self-report supervisory alliance, alliance, and outcome data from 124 parents (M age = 39.83 years, SD = 6.98), professionals (n = 84, M age = 43.66 years, SD = 10.46), and supervisors (n = 26, M age = 47.18 years, SD = 8.28) collected early and late in care were analyzed using structural equation modeling.ResultsA stronger professional-reported supervisory alliance was related to a stronger professional-reported alliance early in care (β = 0.27, p < 0.01), and predicted higher levels of parent-reported satisfaction with care (β = 0.19, p < .05; β = 0.25, p < 0.01), and professional-reported satisfaction with care (β = 0.21, p < 0.01). A stronger supervisory alliance reported by supervisors predicted parent-reported improvement in parent functioning (β = 0.26, p < 0.05), and higher levels of professional-reported satisfaction with care (β = 0.19, p < 0.05; β = .14, p < 0.05). Finally, effects of professional-reported supervisory alliance on professional-reported satisfaction with care were mediated through higher levels of professional-reported alliance (β = 0.06, p < 0.05; β = .07, p < 0.05).ConclusionsA strong supervisory alliance may relate to strong alliances and positive outcomes of home-based parenting support. Future research needs to identify factors that contribute to strong supervisory alliances and explain linkages between the supervisory alliance, the alliance, and outcomes.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)993-1004
JournalJournal of Child and Family Studies
Volume28
Issue number4
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2019

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Parenting
parents
Self Report
Parents
Organizations

Keywords

  • AGREEMENT
  • Alliance
  • CHILD
  • CLIMATE
  • INVENTORY
  • MENTAL-HEALTH
  • Parent
  • Parenting support
  • Professional
  • QUESTIONNAIRE
  • STRATEGIES
  • Supervisor
  • THERAPEUTIC ALLIANCE
  • VALIDATION
  • WORKING ALLIANCE
  • Youth care

Cite this

de Greef, M., Delsing, M. J. M. H., McLeod, B. D., Pijnenburg, H. M., Scholte, R. H. J., van Vugt, J., & van Hattum, M. J. C. (2019). Supervisory alliance: Key to positive alliances and outcomes in home-based parenting support? Journal of Child and Family Studies, 28(4), 993-1004. https://doi.org/10.1007/s10826-018-01317-0
de Greef, M. ; Delsing, M. J. M. H. ; McLeod, B. D. ; Pijnenburg, H. M. ; Scholte, R. H. J. ; van Vugt, J. ; van Hattum, M. J. C. / Supervisory alliance : Key to positive alliances and outcomes in home-based parenting support?. In: Journal of Child and Family Studies. 2019 ; Vol. 28, No. 4. pp. 993-1004.
@article{55e2ea0e02bc498283ffea03b19577a8,
title = "Supervisory alliance: Key to positive alliances and outcomes in home-based parenting support?",
abstract = "ObjectivesThis study investigated whether the supervisory alliance between professionals and supervisors contributes to strong client-professional alliances and positive outcomes of home-based parenting support provided by youth care organizations.MethodsMulti-informant self-report supervisory alliance, alliance, and outcome data from 124 parents (M age = 39.83 years, SD = 6.98), professionals (n = 84, M age = 43.66 years, SD = 10.46), and supervisors (n = 26, M age = 47.18 years, SD = 8.28) collected early and late in care were analyzed using structural equation modeling.ResultsA stronger professional-reported supervisory alliance was related to a stronger professional-reported alliance early in care (β = 0.27, p < 0.01), and predicted higher levels of parent-reported satisfaction with care (β = 0.19, p < .05; β = 0.25, p < 0.01), and professional-reported satisfaction with care (β = 0.21, p < 0.01). A stronger supervisory alliance reported by supervisors predicted parent-reported improvement in parent functioning (β = 0.26, p < 0.05), and higher levels of professional-reported satisfaction with care (β = 0.19, p < 0.05; β = .14, p < 0.05). Finally, effects of professional-reported supervisory alliance on professional-reported satisfaction with care were mediated through higher levels of professional-reported alliance (β = 0.06, p < 0.05; β = .07, p < 0.05).ConclusionsA strong supervisory alliance may relate to strong alliances and positive outcomes of home-based parenting support. Future research needs to identify factors that contribute to strong supervisory alliances and explain linkages between the supervisory alliance, the alliance, and outcomes.",
keywords = "AGREEMENT, Alliance, CHILD, CLIMATE, INVENTORY, MENTAL-HEALTH, Parent, Parenting support, Professional, QUESTIONNAIRE, STRATEGIES, Supervisor, THERAPEUTIC ALLIANCE, VALIDATION, WORKING ALLIANCE, Youth care",
author = "{de Greef}, M. and Delsing, {M. J. M. H.} and McLeod, {B. D.} and Pijnenburg, {H. M.} and Scholte, {R. H. J.} and {van Vugt}, J. and {van Hattum}, {M. J. C.}",
year = "2019",
doi = "10.1007/s10826-018-01317-0",
language = "English",
volume = "28",
pages = "993--1004",
journal = "Journal of Child and Family Studies",
issn = "1062-1024",
publisher = "Springer New York",
number = "4",

}

de Greef, M, Delsing, MJMH, McLeod, BD, Pijnenburg, HM, Scholte, RHJ, van Vugt, J & van Hattum, MJC 2019, 'Supervisory alliance: Key to positive alliances and outcomes in home-based parenting support?' Journal of Child and Family Studies, vol. 28, no. 4, pp. 993-1004. https://doi.org/10.1007/s10826-018-01317-0

Supervisory alliance : Key to positive alliances and outcomes in home-based parenting support? / de Greef, M.; Delsing, M. J. M. H.; McLeod, B. D. ; Pijnenburg, H. M.; Scholte, R. H. J.; van Vugt, J.; van Hattum, M. J. C.

In: Journal of Child and Family Studies, Vol. 28, No. 4, 2019, p. 993-1004.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleScientificpeer-review

TY - JOUR

T1 - Supervisory alliance

T2 - Key to positive alliances and outcomes in home-based parenting support?

AU - de Greef, M.

AU - Delsing, M. J. M. H.

AU - McLeod, B. D.

AU - Pijnenburg, H. M.

AU - Scholte, R. H. J.

AU - van Vugt, J.

AU - van Hattum, M. J. C.

PY - 2019

Y1 - 2019

N2 - ObjectivesThis study investigated whether the supervisory alliance between professionals and supervisors contributes to strong client-professional alliances and positive outcomes of home-based parenting support provided by youth care organizations.MethodsMulti-informant self-report supervisory alliance, alliance, and outcome data from 124 parents (M age = 39.83 years, SD = 6.98), professionals (n = 84, M age = 43.66 years, SD = 10.46), and supervisors (n = 26, M age = 47.18 years, SD = 8.28) collected early and late in care were analyzed using structural equation modeling.ResultsA stronger professional-reported supervisory alliance was related to a stronger professional-reported alliance early in care (β = 0.27, p < 0.01), and predicted higher levels of parent-reported satisfaction with care (β = 0.19, p < .05; β = 0.25, p < 0.01), and professional-reported satisfaction with care (β = 0.21, p < 0.01). A stronger supervisory alliance reported by supervisors predicted parent-reported improvement in parent functioning (β = 0.26, p < 0.05), and higher levels of professional-reported satisfaction with care (β = 0.19, p < 0.05; β = .14, p < 0.05). Finally, effects of professional-reported supervisory alliance on professional-reported satisfaction with care were mediated through higher levels of professional-reported alliance (β = 0.06, p < 0.05; β = .07, p < 0.05).ConclusionsA strong supervisory alliance may relate to strong alliances and positive outcomes of home-based parenting support. Future research needs to identify factors that contribute to strong supervisory alliances and explain linkages between the supervisory alliance, the alliance, and outcomes.

AB - ObjectivesThis study investigated whether the supervisory alliance between professionals and supervisors contributes to strong client-professional alliances and positive outcomes of home-based parenting support provided by youth care organizations.MethodsMulti-informant self-report supervisory alliance, alliance, and outcome data from 124 parents (M age = 39.83 years, SD = 6.98), professionals (n = 84, M age = 43.66 years, SD = 10.46), and supervisors (n = 26, M age = 47.18 years, SD = 8.28) collected early and late in care were analyzed using structural equation modeling.ResultsA stronger professional-reported supervisory alliance was related to a stronger professional-reported alliance early in care (β = 0.27, p < 0.01), and predicted higher levels of parent-reported satisfaction with care (β = 0.19, p < .05; β = 0.25, p < 0.01), and professional-reported satisfaction with care (β = 0.21, p < 0.01). A stronger supervisory alliance reported by supervisors predicted parent-reported improvement in parent functioning (β = 0.26, p < 0.05), and higher levels of professional-reported satisfaction with care (β = 0.19, p < 0.05; β = .14, p < 0.05). Finally, effects of professional-reported supervisory alliance on professional-reported satisfaction with care were mediated through higher levels of professional-reported alliance (β = 0.06, p < 0.05; β = .07, p < 0.05).ConclusionsA strong supervisory alliance may relate to strong alliances and positive outcomes of home-based parenting support. Future research needs to identify factors that contribute to strong supervisory alliances and explain linkages between the supervisory alliance, the alliance, and outcomes.

KW - AGREEMENT

KW - Alliance

KW - CHILD

KW - CLIMATE

KW - INVENTORY

KW - MENTAL-HEALTH

KW - Parent

KW - Parenting support

KW - Professional

KW - QUESTIONNAIRE

KW - STRATEGIES

KW - Supervisor

KW - THERAPEUTIC ALLIANCE

KW - VALIDATION

KW - WORKING ALLIANCE

KW - Youth care

U2 - 10.1007/s10826-018-01317-0

DO - 10.1007/s10826-018-01317-0

M3 - Article

VL - 28

SP - 993

EP - 1004

JO - Journal of Child and Family Studies

JF - Journal of Child and Family Studies

SN - 1062-1024

IS - 4

ER -