Tailored information for cancer patients on the Internet: effects of visual cues and language complexity on information recall and satisfaction

J.C.M. van Weert, G. van Noort, N. Bol, L. van Dijk, K. Tates, J. Jansen

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleScientificpeer-review

Abstract

ObjectiveThis study was designed to investigate the effects of visual cues and language complexity on satisfaction and information recall using a personalised website for lung cancer patients. In addition, age effects were investigated.MethodsAn experiment using a 2 (complex vs. non-complex language) × 3 (text only vs. photograph vs. drawing) factorial design was conducted. In total, 200 respondents without cancer were exposed to one of the six conditions.ResultsRespondents were more satisfied with the comprehensibility of both websites when they were presented with a visual cue. A significant interaction effect was found between language complexity and photograph use such that satisfaction with comprehensibility improved when a photograph was added to the complex language condition. Next, an interaction effect was found between age and satisfaction, which indicates that adding a visual cue is more important for older adults than younger adults. Finally, respondents who were exposed to a website with less complex language showed higher recall scores.ConclusionThe use of visual cues enhances satisfaction with the information presented on the website, and the use of non-complex language improves recall.Practice implicationsThe results of the current study can be used to improve computer-based information systems for patients.
LanguageEnglish
Pages368-378
Number of pages11
JournalPatient Education and Counseling
Volume84
Issue number3
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2011

Fingerprint

Cues
Language
Neoplasms
Information Systems
Young Adult
Surveys and Questionnaires

Cite this

@article{14926849c9e24f3598ec700fec105fb7,
title = "Tailored information for cancer patients on the Internet: effects of visual cues and language complexity on information recall and satisfaction",
abstract = "ObjectiveThis study was designed to investigate the effects of visual cues and language complexity on satisfaction and information recall using a personalised website for lung cancer patients. In addition, age effects were investigated.MethodsAn experiment using a 2 (complex vs. non-complex language) × 3 (text only vs. photograph vs. drawing) factorial design was conducted. In total, 200 respondents without cancer were exposed to one of the six conditions.ResultsRespondents were more satisfied with the comprehensibility of both websites when they were presented with a visual cue. A significant interaction effect was found between language complexity and photograph use such that satisfaction with comprehensibility improved when a photograph was added to the complex language condition. Next, an interaction effect was found between age and satisfaction, which indicates that adding a visual cue is more important for older adults than younger adults. Finally, respondents who were exposed to a website with less complex language showed higher recall scores.ConclusionThe use of visual cues enhances satisfaction with the information presented on the website, and the use of non-complex language improves recall.Practice implicationsThe results of the current study can be used to improve computer-based information systems for patients.",
author = "{van Weert}, J.C.M. and {van Noort}, G. and N. Bol and {van Dijk}, L. and K. Tates and J. Jansen",
year = "2011",
doi = "10.1016/j.pec.2011.04.006",
language = "English",
volume = "84",
pages = "368--378",
journal = "Patient Education and Counseling",
issn = "0738-3991",
publisher = "Elsevier Ireland Ltd",
number = "3",

}

Tailored information for cancer patients on the Internet : effects of visual cues and language complexity on information recall and satisfaction. / van Weert, J.C.M.; van Noort, G.; Bol, N.; van Dijk, L.; Tates, K.; Jansen, J.

In: Patient Education and Counseling, Vol. 84, No. 3, 2011, p. 368-378.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleScientificpeer-review

TY - JOUR

T1 - Tailored information for cancer patients on the Internet

T2 - Patient Education and Counseling

AU - van Weert, J.C.M.

AU - van Noort, G.

AU - Bol, N.

AU - van Dijk, L.

AU - Tates, K.

AU - Jansen, J.

PY - 2011

Y1 - 2011

N2 - ObjectiveThis study was designed to investigate the effects of visual cues and language complexity on satisfaction and information recall using a personalised website for lung cancer patients. In addition, age effects were investigated.MethodsAn experiment using a 2 (complex vs. non-complex language) × 3 (text only vs. photograph vs. drawing) factorial design was conducted. In total, 200 respondents without cancer were exposed to one of the six conditions.ResultsRespondents were more satisfied with the comprehensibility of both websites when they were presented with a visual cue. A significant interaction effect was found between language complexity and photograph use such that satisfaction with comprehensibility improved when a photograph was added to the complex language condition. Next, an interaction effect was found between age and satisfaction, which indicates that adding a visual cue is more important for older adults than younger adults. Finally, respondents who were exposed to a website with less complex language showed higher recall scores.ConclusionThe use of visual cues enhances satisfaction with the information presented on the website, and the use of non-complex language improves recall.Practice implicationsThe results of the current study can be used to improve computer-based information systems for patients.

AB - ObjectiveThis study was designed to investigate the effects of visual cues and language complexity on satisfaction and information recall using a personalised website for lung cancer patients. In addition, age effects were investigated.MethodsAn experiment using a 2 (complex vs. non-complex language) × 3 (text only vs. photograph vs. drawing) factorial design was conducted. In total, 200 respondents without cancer were exposed to one of the six conditions.ResultsRespondents were more satisfied with the comprehensibility of both websites when they were presented with a visual cue. A significant interaction effect was found between language complexity and photograph use such that satisfaction with comprehensibility improved when a photograph was added to the complex language condition. Next, an interaction effect was found between age and satisfaction, which indicates that adding a visual cue is more important for older adults than younger adults. Finally, respondents who were exposed to a website with less complex language showed higher recall scores.ConclusionThe use of visual cues enhances satisfaction with the information presented on the website, and the use of non-complex language improves recall.Practice implicationsThe results of the current study can be used to improve computer-based information systems for patients.

U2 - 10.1016/j.pec.2011.04.006

DO - 10.1016/j.pec.2011.04.006

M3 - Article

VL - 84

SP - 368

EP - 378

JO - Patient Education and Counseling

JF - Patient Education and Counseling

SN - 0738-3991

IS - 3

ER -