The Augmented Cognitive Mediation Model: Examining Antecedents of Factual and Structural Breast Cancer Knowledge Among Singaporean Women

E.W.J. Lee, M. Shin, A. Kawaja, S.S. Ho

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleScientificpeer-review

7 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

As knowledge acquisition is an important component of health communication research, this study examines factors associated with Singaporean women’s breast cancer knowledge using an augmented cognitive mediation model. We conducted a nationally representative study that surveyed 802 women between the ages of 30 and 70 using random-digit dialing. The results supported the augmented cognitive mediation model, which proposes the inclusion of risk perception as a motivator of health information seeking and structural knowledge as an additional knowledge dimension. There was adequate support for the hypothesized paths in the model. Risk perception was positively associated with attention to newspaper, television, Internet, and interpersonal communication. Attention to the three media channels was associated with interpersonal communication, but only newspaper and television attention were associated with elaboration. Interpersonal communication was positively associated with structural knowledge, whereas elaboration was associated with both factual and structural knowledge. Differential indirect effects between media attention and knowledge dimensions via interpersonal communication and elaboration were found. Theoretical and practical implications are discussed.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)583-592
JournalJournal of Health Communication
Volume21
Issue number5
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2016
Externally publishedYes

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