The Continuity Between DSM-5 Obsessive-Compulsive Personality Disorder Traits and Obsessive-Compulsive Symptoms in Adolescence

An Item Response Theory Study

Elien De Caluwe*, David C. Rettew, Barbara De Clercq

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleScientificpeer-review

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Abstract

Objective: Various studies have shown that obsessive-compulsive symptoms exist as part of not only obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) but also obsessive-compulsive personality disorder (OCPD). Despite these shared characteristics, there is an ongoing debate on the inclusion of OCPD into the recently developed DSM-5 obsessive-compulsive and related disorders (OCRDs) category. The current study aims to clarify whether this inclusion can be justified from an item response theory approach.

Method: The validity of the continuity model for understanding the association between OCD and OCPD was explored in 787 Dutch community and referred adolescents (70% female, 12-20 years old, mean = 16.16, SD = 1.40) studied between July 2011 and January 2013, relying on item response theory (IRT) analyses of self-reported OCD symptoms (Youth Obsessive-Compulsive Symptoms Scale [YOCSS]) and OCPD traits (Personality Inventory for DSM-5 [PID-5]).

Results: The results support the continuity hypothesis, indicating that both OCD and OCPD can be represented along a single underlying spectrum. OCD, and especially the obsessive symptom domain, can be considered as the extreme end of OCPD traits.

Conclusions: The current study empirically supports the classification of OCD and OCPD along a single dimension. This integrative perspective in OC-related pathology addresses the dimensional nature of traits and psychopathology and may improve the transparency and validity of assessment procedures. (C) Copyright 2014 Physicians Postgraduate Press, Inc.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)E1271-E1277
Number of pages7
JournalJournal of Clinical Psychiatry
Volume75
Issue number11
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Nov 2014
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • ABNORMAL-PERSONALITY
  • FIT INDEXES
  • MODEL
  • SPECTRUM
  • BORDERLINE
  • DIMENSIONS
  • STRATEGIES
  • CHILDHOOD
  • INVENTORY
  • CHILDREN

Cite this

@article{3cef04d7281149f98dc27bfb01e3bcdb,
title = "The Continuity Between DSM-5 Obsessive-Compulsive Personality Disorder Traits and Obsessive-Compulsive Symptoms in Adolescence: An Item Response Theory Study",
abstract = "Objective: Various studies have shown that obsessive-compulsive symptoms exist as part of not only obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) but also obsessive-compulsive personality disorder (OCPD). Despite these shared characteristics, there is an ongoing debate on the inclusion of OCPD into the recently developed DSM-5 obsessive-compulsive and related disorders (OCRDs) category. The current study aims to clarify whether this inclusion can be justified from an item response theory approach.Method: The validity of the continuity model for understanding the association between OCD and OCPD was explored in 787 Dutch community and referred adolescents (70{\%} female, 12-20 years old, mean = 16.16, SD = 1.40) studied between July 2011 and January 2013, relying on item response theory (IRT) analyses of self-reported OCD symptoms (Youth Obsessive-Compulsive Symptoms Scale [YOCSS]) and OCPD traits (Personality Inventory for DSM-5 [PID-5]).Results: The results support the continuity hypothesis, indicating that both OCD and OCPD can be represented along a single underlying spectrum. OCD, and especially the obsessive symptom domain, can be considered as the extreme end of OCPD traits.Conclusions: The current study empirically supports the classification of OCD and OCPD along a single dimension. This integrative perspective in OC-related pathology addresses the dimensional nature of traits and psychopathology and may improve the transparency and validity of assessment procedures. (C) Copyright 2014 Physicians Postgraduate Press, Inc.",
keywords = "ABNORMAL-PERSONALITY, FIT INDEXES, MODEL, SPECTRUM, BORDERLINE, DIMENSIONS, STRATEGIES, CHILDHOOD, INVENTORY, CHILDREN",
author = "{De Caluwe}, Elien and Rettew, {David C.} and {De Clercq}, Barbara",
year = "2014",
month = "11",
doi = "10.4088/JCP.14m09039",
language = "English",
volume = "75",
pages = "E1271--E1277",
journal = "Journal of Clinical Psychiatry",
issn = "0160-6689",
publisher = "Physicians Postgraduate Press Inc.",
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}

The Continuity Between DSM-5 Obsessive-Compulsive Personality Disorder Traits and Obsessive-Compulsive Symptoms in Adolescence : An Item Response Theory Study. / De Caluwe, Elien; Rettew, David C.; De Clercq, Barbara.

In: Journal of Clinical Psychiatry, Vol. 75, No. 11, 11.2014, p. E1271-E1277.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleScientificpeer-review

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T1 - The Continuity Between DSM-5 Obsessive-Compulsive Personality Disorder Traits and Obsessive-Compulsive Symptoms in Adolescence

T2 - An Item Response Theory Study

AU - De Caluwe, Elien

AU - Rettew, David C.

AU - De Clercq, Barbara

PY - 2014/11

Y1 - 2014/11

N2 - Objective: Various studies have shown that obsessive-compulsive symptoms exist as part of not only obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) but also obsessive-compulsive personality disorder (OCPD). Despite these shared characteristics, there is an ongoing debate on the inclusion of OCPD into the recently developed DSM-5 obsessive-compulsive and related disorders (OCRDs) category. The current study aims to clarify whether this inclusion can be justified from an item response theory approach.Method: The validity of the continuity model for understanding the association between OCD and OCPD was explored in 787 Dutch community and referred adolescents (70% female, 12-20 years old, mean = 16.16, SD = 1.40) studied between July 2011 and January 2013, relying on item response theory (IRT) analyses of self-reported OCD symptoms (Youth Obsessive-Compulsive Symptoms Scale [YOCSS]) and OCPD traits (Personality Inventory for DSM-5 [PID-5]).Results: The results support the continuity hypothesis, indicating that both OCD and OCPD can be represented along a single underlying spectrum. OCD, and especially the obsessive symptom domain, can be considered as the extreme end of OCPD traits.Conclusions: The current study empirically supports the classification of OCD and OCPD along a single dimension. This integrative perspective in OC-related pathology addresses the dimensional nature of traits and psychopathology and may improve the transparency and validity of assessment procedures. (C) Copyright 2014 Physicians Postgraduate Press, Inc.

AB - Objective: Various studies have shown that obsessive-compulsive symptoms exist as part of not only obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) but also obsessive-compulsive personality disorder (OCPD). Despite these shared characteristics, there is an ongoing debate on the inclusion of OCPD into the recently developed DSM-5 obsessive-compulsive and related disorders (OCRDs) category. The current study aims to clarify whether this inclusion can be justified from an item response theory approach.Method: The validity of the continuity model for understanding the association between OCD and OCPD was explored in 787 Dutch community and referred adolescents (70% female, 12-20 years old, mean = 16.16, SD = 1.40) studied between July 2011 and January 2013, relying on item response theory (IRT) analyses of self-reported OCD symptoms (Youth Obsessive-Compulsive Symptoms Scale [YOCSS]) and OCPD traits (Personality Inventory for DSM-5 [PID-5]).Results: The results support the continuity hypothesis, indicating that both OCD and OCPD can be represented along a single underlying spectrum. OCD, and especially the obsessive symptom domain, can be considered as the extreme end of OCPD traits.Conclusions: The current study empirically supports the classification of OCD and OCPD along a single dimension. This integrative perspective in OC-related pathology addresses the dimensional nature of traits and psychopathology and may improve the transparency and validity of assessment procedures. (C) Copyright 2014 Physicians Postgraduate Press, Inc.

KW - ABNORMAL-PERSONALITY

KW - FIT INDEXES

KW - MODEL

KW - SPECTRUM

KW - BORDERLINE

KW - DIMENSIONS

KW - STRATEGIES

KW - CHILDHOOD

KW - INVENTORY

KW - CHILDREN

U2 - 10.4088/JCP.14m09039

DO - 10.4088/JCP.14m09039

M3 - Article

VL - 75

SP - E1271-E1277

JO - Journal of Clinical Psychiatry

JF - Journal of Clinical Psychiatry

SN - 0160-6689

IS - 11

ER -