The DSM-5 trait measure in a psychiatric sample of late adolescents and emerging adults: Structure, reliability, and validity

E.A.L. De Caluwé*, Lize Verbeke, Marcel A. G. van Aken, P.T. van der Heijden, Barbara De Clercq

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleScientificpeer-review

Abstract

The inclusion of a dimensional trait model of personality pathology in DSM-5 creates new opportunities for research on developmental antecedents of personality pathology. The traits of this model can be measured with the Personality Inventory for DSM-5 (PID-5), initially developed for adults, but also demonstrating validity in adolescents. The present study adds to the growing body of literature on the psychometrics of the PID-5, by examining its structure, validity, and reliability in 187 psychiatric-referred late adolescents and emerging adults. PID-5, Big Five Inventory, and Kidscreen self-reports were provided, and 88 non-clinical matched controls completed the PID-5. Results confirm the PID-5's five-factor structure, indicate adequate psychometric properties, and underscore the construct and criterion validity, showing meaningful associations with adaptive traits and quality of life. Results are discussed in terms of the PID-5's applicability in vulnerable populations who are going through important developmental transition phases, such as the step towards early adulthood.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)101-118
JournalJournal of Personality Disorders
Volume33
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2019

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Keywords

  • 5-FACTOR MODEL
  • ABNORMAL-PERSONALITY
  • DIMENSIONAL MODELS
  • DISORDERS
  • FACETS
  • INVENTORY
  • MALADAPTIVE PERSONALITY-TRAITS
  • PATHOLOGICAL PERSONALITY
  • PID-5
  • PSYCHOMETRIC PROPERTIES

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