The duration of response inhibition in the stop-signal paradigm varies with response force

W.P.M. van den Wildenberg, G.J.M. van Boxtel, M. van der Molen

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleScientificpeer-review

Abstract

In a previous study, we have found that the speed of stopping a response is delayed when response readiness is reduced by cuing the probability of no-go trials [Acta Psychol. 111 (2002) 155]. Other investigators observed that responses are more forceful when the probability to respond is low than when it is high (e.g. [Quart. J. Exp. Psychol. A 50 (1997) 405]). In this study, the hypothesis was tested that low probability responses are more forceful than high probability responses and that these responses are more difficult to stop. Subjects performed on a choice reaction task and on three tasks with respectively 100%, 80%, and 50% response probabilities. Stop signals were presented on 30% of the trials, instructing subjects to withhold their response. Response force on non-signal (go) trials and the duration of response inhibition on signal (stop) trials increased as response probability decreased. This pattern of findings was interpreted to support the hypothesis predicting that stopping is more difficult when response readiness is low than when it is high.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)115-129
JournalActa Psychologica
Volume114
Issue number2
Publication statusPublished - 2003

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van den Wildenberg, W.P.M. ; van Boxtel, G.J.M. ; van der Molen, M. / The duration of response inhibition in the stop-signal paradigm varies with response force. In: Acta Psychologica. 2003 ; Vol. 114, No. 2. pp. 115-129.
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title = "The duration of response inhibition in the stop-signal paradigm varies with response force",
abstract = "In a previous study, we have found that the speed of stopping a response is delayed when response readiness is reduced by cuing the probability of no-go trials [Acta Psychol. 111 (2002) 155]. Other investigators observed that responses are more forceful when the probability to respond is low than when it is high (e.g. [Quart. J. Exp. Psychol. A 50 (1997) 405]). In this study, the hypothesis was tested that low probability responses are more forceful than high probability responses and that these responses are more difficult to stop. Subjects performed on a choice reaction task and on three tasks with respectively 100{\%}, 80{\%}, and 50{\%} response probabilities. Stop signals were presented on 30{\%} of the trials, instructing subjects to withhold their response. Response force on non-signal (go) trials and the duration of response inhibition on signal (stop) trials increased as response probability decreased. This pattern of findings was interpreted to support the hypothesis predicting that stopping is more difficult when response readiness is low than when it is high.",
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van den Wildenberg, WPM, van Boxtel, GJM & van der Molen, M 2003, 'The duration of response inhibition in the stop-signal paradigm varies with response force', Acta Psychologica, vol. 114, no. 2, pp. 115-129.

The duration of response inhibition in the stop-signal paradigm varies with response force. / van den Wildenberg, W.P.M.; van Boxtel, G.J.M.; van der Molen, M.

In: Acta Psychologica, Vol. 114, No. 2, 2003, p. 115-129.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleScientificpeer-review

TY - JOUR

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AB - In a previous study, we have found that the speed of stopping a response is delayed when response readiness is reduced by cuing the probability of no-go trials [Acta Psychol. 111 (2002) 155]. Other investigators observed that responses are more forceful when the probability to respond is low than when it is high (e.g. [Quart. J. Exp. Psychol. A 50 (1997) 405]). In this study, the hypothesis was tested that low probability responses are more forceful than high probability responses and that these responses are more difficult to stop. Subjects performed on a choice reaction task and on three tasks with respectively 100%, 80%, and 50% response probabilities. Stop signals were presented on 30% of the trials, instructing subjects to withhold their response. Response force on non-signal (go) trials and the duration of response inhibition on signal (stop) trials increased as response probability decreased. This pattern of findings was interpreted to support the hypothesis predicting that stopping is more difficult when response readiness is low than when it is high.

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