The early inception of labor market gender differences

P. Kooreman

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleScientificpeer-review

Abstract

This paper analyzes gender differences in jobs while in school using school-class-based samples, a setting in which education differences, “glass ceilings”, and career interruptions due to parenthood are irrelevant. I find that in this early stage of life boys already earn substantially more than girls. The earnings gap cannot be explained by differences in participation rates and hours of work, nor by gender wage gaps within job types. It is entirely due to the fact that girls work more in job types with relatively low wages, in particular babysitting. During the period considered, 1984–2001, the gender patterns of jobs while in school largely remained unchanged.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)135-139
JournalLabour Economics
Volume16
Issue number2
Publication statusPublished - 2009

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Gender differences
Labour market
Interruption
Glass ceiling
Wages
Gender wage gap
Education
Participation rate
Earnings gap
Hours of work
Parenthood

Cite this

Kooreman, P. / The early inception of labor market gender differences. In: Labour Economics. 2009 ; Vol. 16, No. 2. pp. 135-139.
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Kooreman, P 2009, 'The early inception of labor market gender differences', Labour Economics, vol. 16, no. 2, pp. 135-139.

The early inception of labor market gender differences. / Kooreman, P.

In: Labour Economics, Vol. 16, No. 2, 2009, p. 135-139.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleScientificpeer-review

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