The family context as a foundation for romantic relationships: A person-centered multi-informant longitudinal study

H. Hadiwijaya*, Theo Klimstra, Nancy Darling , Jeroen Vermunt, Susan Branje, W.H.J. Meeus

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleScientificpeer-review

Abstract

This 8-wave person-centered multi-informant study tested whether the quality of parent–adolescent relationships predicted the romantic experiences of young adults and their partners (N 374; 54.8% girls; Mage 13.08 years, SDage 0.48 at the first measurement wave). Perceptions of parent–adolescent relationships were assessed using adolescent, mother, and father reports. Results show that both young adults and their partners reported the highest levels of support, intimacy, and passion when young adults had an authoritative relationship quality with their parents. A distant parent–adolescent relationship quality, however, predicted the lowest support, intimacy, and passion in romantic relationships. Interestingly, the association between parent–adolescent relationships with the experience of young adults’ romantic partners was indirect. Parent– adolescent relationships predicted target young adults’ romantic relationship experiences, which predicted partners’ romantic relationship experiences. Parent–child relationship quality therefore has far-reaching, yet subtle, effects on later romantic relationships, affecting both young adults and their partners.
Original languageEnglish
JournalJournal of Family Psychology
DOIs
Publication statusE-pub ahead of print - 2020

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@article{b53040b9f1db4a20b53380c238b026e4,
title = "The family context as a foundation for romantic relationships: A person-centered multi-informant longitudinal study",
abstract = "This 8-wave person-centered multi-informant study tested whether the quality of parent–adolescent relationships predicted the romantic experiences of young adults and their partners (N 374; 54.8{\%} girls; Mage 13.08 years, SDage 0.48 at the first measurement wave). Perceptions of parent–adolescent relationships were assessed using adolescent, mother, and father reports. Results show that both young adults and their partners reported the highest levels of support, intimacy, and passion when young adults had an authoritative relationship quality with their parents. A distant parent–adolescent relationship quality, however, predicted the lowest support, intimacy, and passion in romantic relationships. Interestingly, the association between parent–adolescent relationships with the experience of young adults’ romantic partners was indirect. Parent– adolescent relationships predicted target young adults’ romantic relationship experiences, which predicted partners’ romantic relationship experiences. Parent–child relationship quality therefore has far-reaching, yet subtle, effects on later romantic relationships, affecting both young adults and their partners.",
author = "H. Hadiwijaya and Theo Klimstra and Nancy Darling and Jeroen Vermunt and Susan Branje and W.H.J. Meeus",
year = "2020",
doi = "10.1037/fam0000601",
language = "English",
journal = "Journal of Family Psychology",
issn = "0893-3200",
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The family context as a foundation for romantic relationships : A person-centered multi-informant longitudinal study. / Hadiwijaya, H.; Klimstra, Theo; Darling , Nancy ; Vermunt, Jeroen; Branje, Susan; Meeus, W.H.J.

In: Journal of Family Psychology, 2020.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleScientificpeer-review

TY - JOUR

T1 - The family context as a foundation for romantic relationships

T2 - A person-centered multi-informant longitudinal study

AU - Hadiwijaya, H.

AU - Klimstra, Theo

AU - Darling , Nancy

AU - Vermunt, Jeroen

AU - Branje, Susan

AU - Meeus, W.H.J.

PY - 2020

Y1 - 2020

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AB - This 8-wave person-centered multi-informant study tested whether the quality of parent–adolescent relationships predicted the romantic experiences of young adults and their partners (N 374; 54.8% girls; Mage 13.08 years, SDage 0.48 at the first measurement wave). Perceptions of parent–adolescent relationships were assessed using adolescent, mother, and father reports. Results show that both young adults and their partners reported the highest levels of support, intimacy, and passion when young adults had an authoritative relationship quality with their parents. A distant parent–adolescent relationship quality, however, predicted the lowest support, intimacy, and passion in romantic relationships. Interestingly, the association between parent–adolescent relationships with the experience of young adults’ romantic partners was indirect. Parent– adolescent relationships predicted target young adults’ romantic relationship experiences, which predicted partners’ romantic relationship experiences. Parent–child relationship quality therefore has far-reaching, yet subtle, effects on later romantic relationships, affecting both young adults and their partners.

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