The impact of forced forensic psychiatric confinement on composition and structure in the personal networks of personality-disordered forensic psychiatric patients

Lydia ter Haar-Pomp*, Marinus Spreen, Beate Volker, Stefan Bogaerts

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleScientificpeer-review

Abstract

This study explored to what extent the composition and structure of personal networks of personality-disordered forensic psychiatric patients changed before and after forced confinement in a forensic psychiatric centre. Semi-structured in-depth interviews with 36 patients and selected members of their networks were examined. During forensic psychiatric treatment, patients reported a decrease in network size, in the number of high-risk network members, and in the number of social ties between these high-risk network members. Personal relationships were of shorter duration, with lower levels of contact frequency and reciprocity. No changes were observed in the patients' companionship, practical and emotional support networks. During forensic psychiatric treatment, patients reported some new relationships, especially with persons outside the forensic psychiatric centre. Information on compositional and structural personal network factors over time helps forensic mental health professionals to properly assess and manage the important dynamic social network conditions associated with recidivism.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)53-75
JournalJournal of Forensic Psychiatry & Psychology
Volume30
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2019

Keywords

  • Forensic psychiatry
  • personal social network
  • personality disorders
  • dynamic risk and protective factors
  • risk management
  • SOCIAL NETWORKS
  • LIFE-COURSE
  • PROTECTIVE FACTORS
  • CRIME
  • RISK

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