The implementation and evaluation of the South African adaptation of the JOBS program

Rachele Paver*, Hans De Witte, Sebastiaan Rothmann, Anja Van den Broeck, Roland Willem Bart Blonk

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleScientificpeer-review

Abstract

No validated intervention that specifically addresses the psychosocial needs of unemployed people exists in the South African context. This study intends to evaluate an evidence-based job-search program, called the JOBS intervention, that is aimed at the self-efficacy, amotivation, and self-esteem related to participants searching for jobs. A quasi-experimental research design was used. Convenient samples were taken of unemployed individuals from two low-income communities (N= 130; experimental group = 69; control group = 61). The Qhubekela Phambili program, which is based on the JOBS program, was adapted for the South African context and was implemented over six 4-h sessions. Data collection took place pre- and post-intervention. One-way repeated measures multivariate analysis of variance was used to analyze the data. Those who had undergone the intervention showed statistically significantly higher levels of job-search self-efficacy and self-esteem. This study makes a novel contribution to the literature on the JOBS program, particularly regarding developing countries. This study showed that in a context characterized by poverty and a lack of support for the unemployed, the program also delivered promising results. It confirms previous findings that the JOBS program is suitable in a variety of labor market and economic conditions.

Original languageEnglish
Article number1418
Number of pages13
JournalFrontiers in Psychology
Volume11
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2020

Keywords

  • job-search self-efficacy
  • amotivation
  • self-esteem
  • job-search intervention
  • JOBS program
  • Qhubekela Phambili career-enhancement program
  • unemployed
  • South Africa
  • SELF-EFFICACY
  • MENTAL-HEALTH
  • UNEMPLOYMENT EXPERIENCE
  • SEARCH BEHAVIOR
  • SOCIAL SUPPORT
  • INTERVENTION
  • REEMPLOYMENT
  • PERSONALITY
  • EMPLOYMENT
  • DEPRESSION

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