The importance of career insecurity for turnover intentions in the Dutch military

M.W. van Eetveldt, N. van de Ven, M. van den Tooren, R.C. Versteeg

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleScientificpeer-review

Abstract

The effects of two dimensions of job insecurity (job loss insecurity and career insecurity) on turnover intentions were tested in a sample from the Dutch armed forces (N = 3,580) after a major downsizing operation was announced. Results suggested that especially perceptions of career insecurity increased turnover intentions. Next to this direct effect, career insecurity was also associated with lowered affective organizational commitment which in turn increased turnover intentions as well. Our results imply that, at least during downsizing operations, a multidimensional conceptualization of job insecurity helps to predict important organizational outcomes in the military. Both perceptions of the risk of losing one’s job and perceptions of possible future career opportunities are important for employee retention.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)489-501
JournalMilitary Psychology
Volume25
Issue number5
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2013

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van Eetveldt, M.W. ; van de Ven, N. ; van den Tooren, M. ; Versteeg, R.C. / The importance of career insecurity for turnover intentions in the Dutch military. In: Military Psychology. 2013 ; Vol. 25, No. 5. pp. 489-501.
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The importance of career insecurity for turnover intentions in the Dutch military. / van Eetveldt, M.W.; van de Ven, N.; van den Tooren, M.; Versteeg, R.C.

In: Military Psychology, Vol. 25, No. 5, 2013, p. 489-501.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleScientificpeer-review

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