The introduction of the practice nurse mental health in general practices in the Netherlands

Effects on number of diagnoses of chronic and acute alcohol abuse

L. Abidi, A. Oenema, P. Verhaak, F.E.S. Tan, H. van de Mheen

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleScientificpeer-review

Abstract

Background
Since 2008 mental health practice nurses have been gradually introduced in general practices in the Netherlands as part of health policy aiming to improve early identification and treatment of mental health problems in primary care. This study aims to investigate the effect of the introduction of the practice nurse mental health in general practices in the Netherlands on the number of diagnoses of chronic and acute alcohol abuse.
Method
The Netherlands Institute for Health Services Research (NIVEL) retrieved data of a representative sample of general practices (n = 155) for this study. Data were aligned at the starting point of the implementation of the PN-MH to compare the practices on our outcome measures after implementation of the PN-MH. Multilevel regression analyses were conducted to investigate differences in average number of chronic and acute alcohol abuse diagnoses between practices with a practice nurse mental health and control practices (without a practice nurse mental health and without a primary care psychologists).
Results
A significant decrease over time of chronic alcohol abuse diagnoses was observed (ß = -.52, p < 0.05) as well as a significant decrease over time of acute alcohol abuse diagnoses (ß = -.06, p < 0.05). After adjustment for multiple comparisons, no significant differences were found between practices that implemented a practice nurse mental health or only have a primary care psychologist and control practices. Practices that implemented a practice nurse mental health and have a primary care psychologist, had a higher mean of chronic and acute alcohol abuse diagnoses than control practices during all periods, but the differences between these groups were not statistically significant.
Conclusions
Based on the results of this study it seems that the introduction of practice nurses mental health in general practices is not associated with increased diagnoses of chronic or acute alcohol abuse. Potential explanations are barriers experienced by practice nurses to addressing alcohol use with patients and prioritization of other mental health issues over alcohol abuse. In order to improve the management of alcohol abuse by practice nurses, more research is needed on how practice nurses can be involved in diagnosing and treatment of patients with alcohol abuse.
Original languageEnglish
Article number48
Number of pages9
JournalBMC Family Practice
Volume20
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2019

Fingerprint

General Practice
Netherlands
Alcoholism
Mental Health
Nurses
Alcohols

Keywords

  • Alcohol abuse
  • BRIEF INTERVENTION
  • Collaborative care
  • DISORDERS
  • Nurse-led care
  • PRIMARY-CARE
  • Practice nurse mental health

Cite this

@article{f4d8b2f760ea4641af255b0666fdd218,
title = "The introduction of the practice nurse mental health in general practices in the Netherlands: Effects on number of diagnoses of chronic and acute alcohol abuse",
abstract = "BackgroundSince 2008 mental health practice nurses have been gradually introduced in general practices in the Netherlands as part of health policy aiming to improve early identification and treatment of mental health problems in primary care. This study aims to investigate the effect of the introduction of the practice nurse mental health in general practices in the Netherlands on the number of diagnoses of chronic and acute alcohol abuse.MethodThe Netherlands Institute for Health Services Research (NIVEL) retrieved data of a representative sample of general practices (n = 155) for this study. Data were aligned at the starting point of the implementation of the PN-MH to compare the practices on our outcome measures after implementation of the PN-MH. Multilevel regression analyses were conducted to investigate differences in average number of chronic and acute alcohol abuse diagnoses between practices with a practice nurse mental health and control practices (without a practice nurse mental health and without a primary care psychologists).ResultsA significant decrease over time of chronic alcohol abuse diagnoses was observed ({\ss} = -.52, p < 0.05) as well as a significant decrease over time of acute alcohol abuse diagnoses ({\ss} = -.06, p < 0.05). After adjustment for multiple comparisons, no significant differences were found between practices that implemented a practice nurse mental health or only have a primary care psychologist and control practices. Practices that implemented a practice nurse mental health and have a primary care psychologist, had a higher mean of chronic and acute alcohol abuse diagnoses than control practices during all periods, but the differences between these groups were not statistically significant.ConclusionsBased on the results of this study it seems that the introduction of practice nurses mental health in general practices is not associated with increased diagnoses of chronic or acute alcohol abuse. Potential explanations are barriers experienced by practice nurses to addressing alcohol use with patients and prioritization of other mental health issues over alcohol abuse. In order to improve the management of alcohol abuse by practice nurses, more research is needed on how practice nurses can be involved in diagnosing and treatment of patients with alcohol abuse.",
keywords = "Alcohol abuse, BRIEF INTERVENTION, Collaborative care, DISORDERS, Nurse-led care, PRIMARY-CARE, Practice nurse mental health",
author = "L. Abidi and A. Oenema and P. Verhaak and F.E.S. Tan and {van de Mheen}, H.",
year = "2019",
doi = "10.1186/s12875-019-0938-3",
language = "English",
volume = "20",
journal = "BMC Family Practice",
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The introduction of the practice nurse mental health in general practices in the Netherlands : Effects on number of diagnoses of chronic and acute alcohol abuse. / Abidi, L.; Oenema, A.; Verhaak, P.; Tan, F.E.S.; van de Mheen, H.

In: BMC Family Practice, Vol. 20, 48, 2019.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleScientificpeer-review

TY - JOUR

T1 - The introduction of the practice nurse mental health in general practices in the Netherlands

T2 - Effects on number of diagnoses of chronic and acute alcohol abuse

AU - Abidi, L.

AU - Oenema, A.

AU - Verhaak, P.

AU - Tan, F.E.S.

AU - van de Mheen, H.

PY - 2019

Y1 - 2019

N2 - BackgroundSince 2008 mental health practice nurses have been gradually introduced in general practices in the Netherlands as part of health policy aiming to improve early identification and treatment of mental health problems in primary care. This study aims to investigate the effect of the introduction of the practice nurse mental health in general practices in the Netherlands on the number of diagnoses of chronic and acute alcohol abuse.MethodThe Netherlands Institute for Health Services Research (NIVEL) retrieved data of a representative sample of general practices (n = 155) for this study. Data were aligned at the starting point of the implementation of the PN-MH to compare the practices on our outcome measures after implementation of the PN-MH. Multilevel regression analyses were conducted to investigate differences in average number of chronic and acute alcohol abuse diagnoses between practices with a practice nurse mental health and control practices (without a practice nurse mental health and without a primary care psychologists).ResultsA significant decrease over time of chronic alcohol abuse diagnoses was observed (ß = -.52, p < 0.05) as well as a significant decrease over time of acute alcohol abuse diagnoses (ß = -.06, p < 0.05). After adjustment for multiple comparisons, no significant differences were found between practices that implemented a practice nurse mental health or only have a primary care psychologist and control practices. Practices that implemented a practice nurse mental health and have a primary care psychologist, had a higher mean of chronic and acute alcohol abuse diagnoses than control practices during all periods, but the differences between these groups were not statistically significant.ConclusionsBased on the results of this study it seems that the introduction of practice nurses mental health in general practices is not associated with increased diagnoses of chronic or acute alcohol abuse. Potential explanations are barriers experienced by practice nurses to addressing alcohol use with patients and prioritization of other mental health issues over alcohol abuse. In order to improve the management of alcohol abuse by practice nurses, more research is needed on how practice nurses can be involved in diagnosing and treatment of patients with alcohol abuse.

AB - BackgroundSince 2008 mental health practice nurses have been gradually introduced in general practices in the Netherlands as part of health policy aiming to improve early identification and treatment of mental health problems in primary care. This study aims to investigate the effect of the introduction of the practice nurse mental health in general practices in the Netherlands on the number of diagnoses of chronic and acute alcohol abuse.MethodThe Netherlands Institute for Health Services Research (NIVEL) retrieved data of a representative sample of general practices (n = 155) for this study. Data were aligned at the starting point of the implementation of the PN-MH to compare the practices on our outcome measures after implementation of the PN-MH. Multilevel regression analyses were conducted to investigate differences in average number of chronic and acute alcohol abuse diagnoses between practices with a practice nurse mental health and control practices (without a practice nurse mental health and without a primary care psychologists).ResultsA significant decrease over time of chronic alcohol abuse diagnoses was observed (ß = -.52, p < 0.05) as well as a significant decrease over time of acute alcohol abuse diagnoses (ß = -.06, p < 0.05). After adjustment for multiple comparisons, no significant differences were found between practices that implemented a practice nurse mental health or only have a primary care psychologist and control practices. Practices that implemented a practice nurse mental health and have a primary care psychologist, had a higher mean of chronic and acute alcohol abuse diagnoses than control practices during all periods, but the differences between these groups were not statistically significant.ConclusionsBased on the results of this study it seems that the introduction of practice nurses mental health in general practices is not associated with increased diagnoses of chronic or acute alcohol abuse. Potential explanations are barriers experienced by practice nurses to addressing alcohol use with patients and prioritization of other mental health issues over alcohol abuse. In order to improve the management of alcohol abuse by practice nurses, more research is needed on how practice nurses can be involved in diagnosing and treatment of patients with alcohol abuse.

KW - Alcohol abuse

KW - BRIEF INTERVENTION

KW - Collaborative care

KW - DISORDERS

KW - Nurse-led care

KW - PRIMARY-CARE

KW - Practice nurse mental health

U2 - 10.1186/s12875-019-0938-3

DO - 10.1186/s12875-019-0938-3

M3 - Article

VL - 20

JO - BMC Family Practice

JF - BMC Family Practice

SN - 1471-2296

M1 - 48

ER -