The longitudinal association between self-esteem and depressive symptoms in adolescents: Separating between-person effects from within-person effects

M. Masselink, E. Van Roekel, B.l. Hankin, L. Keijsers, G.M.A. Lodder, J. Vanhalst, M. Verhagen, J.f. Young, A.j. Oldehinkel

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Abstract

Many longitudinal studies have investigated whether self‐esteem predicts depressive symptoms (vulnerability model) or the other way around (scar model) in adolescents. The most common method of analysis has been the cross‐lagged panel model (CLPM). The CLPM does not separate between‐person effects from within‐person effects, making it unclear whether the results from previous studies actually reflect the within‐person effects or whether they reflect differences between people. We investigated the associations between self‐esteem and depressive symptoms at the within‐person level, using random intercept cross‐lagged panel models (RI‐CLPMs). To get an impression of the magnitude of possible differences between the RI‐CLPM and the CLPM, we compared the results of both models. We used data from three longitudinal adolescent samples (age range: 7–18 years; study 1: N = 1948; study 2: N = 1455; study 3: N = 316). Intervals between the measurements were 1–1.5 years. Single‐paper meta‐analyses showed support for small within‐person associations from self‐esteem to depressive symptoms, but not the other way around, thus only providing some support for the vulnerability model. The cross‐lagged associations in the aggregated RI‐CLPM and CLPM showed similar effect sizes. Overall, our results show that over 1‐ to 1.5‐year time intervals, low self‐esteem may negatively influence depressive symptoms over time within adolescents, but only weakly so.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)653-671
JournalEuropean Journal of Personality
Volume32
Issue number6
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2018

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Depression

Keywords

  • COMPONENTS
  • EPISODE
  • GOODNESS-OF-FIT
  • HOPELESSNESS
  • PROSPECTIVELY PREDICTS DEPRESSION
  • RANDOM-EFFECTS MODELS
  • RISK-FACTOR
  • TIME
  • VULNERABILITY
  • YOUNG ADULTHOOD
  • depression
  • longitudinal data
  • random intercept cross-lagged panel model
  • self-esteem
  • within-person effects

Cite this

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title = "The longitudinal association between self-esteem and depressive symptoms in adolescents: Separating between-person effects from within-person effects",
abstract = "Many longitudinal studies have investigated whether self‐esteem predicts depressive symptoms (vulnerability model) or the other way around (scar model) in adolescents. The most common method of analysis has been the cross‐lagged panel model (CLPM). The CLPM does not separate between‐person effects from within‐person effects, making it unclear whether the results from previous studies actually reflect the within‐person effects or whether they reflect differences between people. We investigated the associations between self‐esteem and depressive symptoms at the within‐person level, using random intercept cross‐lagged panel models (RI‐CLPMs). To get an impression of the magnitude of possible differences between the RI‐CLPM and the CLPM, we compared the results of both models. We used data from three longitudinal adolescent samples (age range: 7–18 years; study 1: N = 1948; study 2: N = 1455; study 3: N = 316). Intervals between the measurements were 1–1.5 years. Single‐paper meta‐analyses showed support for small within‐person associations from self‐esteem to depressive symptoms, but not the other way around, thus only providing some support for the vulnerability model. The cross‐lagged associations in the aggregated RI‐CLPM and CLPM showed similar effect sizes. Overall, our results show that over 1‐ to 1.5‐year time intervals, low self‐esteem may negatively influence depressive symptoms over time within adolescents, but only weakly so.",
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The longitudinal association between self-esteem and depressive symptoms in adolescents : Separating between-person effects from within-person effects. / Masselink, M.; Van Roekel, E.; Hankin, B.l.; Keijsers, L.; Lodder, G.M.A.; Vanhalst, J.; Verhagen, M.; Young, J.f.; Oldehinkel, A.j.

In: European Journal of Personality, Vol. 32, No. 6, 2018, p. 653-671.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleScientificpeer-review

TY - JOUR

T1 - The longitudinal association between self-esteem and depressive symptoms in adolescents

T2 - Separating between-person effects from within-person effects

AU - Masselink, M.

AU - Van Roekel, E.

AU - Hankin, B.l.

AU - Keijsers, L.

AU - Lodder, G.M.A.

AU - Vanhalst, J.

AU - Verhagen, M.

AU - Young, J.f.

AU - Oldehinkel, A.j.

PY - 2018

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N2 - Many longitudinal studies have investigated whether self‐esteem predicts depressive symptoms (vulnerability model) or the other way around (scar model) in adolescents. The most common method of analysis has been the cross‐lagged panel model (CLPM). The CLPM does not separate between‐person effects from within‐person effects, making it unclear whether the results from previous studies actually reflect the within‐person effects or whether they reflect differences between people. We investigated the associations between self‐esteem and depressive symptoms at the within‐person level, using random intercept cross‐lagged panel models (RI‐CLPMs). To get an impression of the magnitude of possible differences between the RI‐CLPM and the CLPM, we compared the results of both models. We used data from three longitudinal adolescent samples (age range: 7–18 years; study 1: N = 1948; study 2: N = 1455; study 3: N = 316). Intervals between the measurements were 1–1.5 years. Single‐paper meta‐analyses showed support for small within‐person associations from self‐esteem to depressive symptoms, but not the other way around, thus only providing some support for the vulnerability model. The cross‐lagged associations in the aggregated RI‐CLPM and CLPM showed similar effect sizes. Overall, our results show that over 1‐ to 1.5‐year time intervals, low self‐esteem may negatively influence depressive symptoms over time within adolescents, but only weakly so.

AB - Many longitudinal studies have investigated whether self‐esteem predicts depressive symptoms (vulnerability model) or the other way around (scar model) in adolescents. The most common method of analysis has been the cross‐lagged panel model (CLPM). The CLPM does not separate between‐person effects from within‐person effects, making it unclear whether the results from previous studies actually reflect the within‐person effects or whether they reflect differences between people. We investigated the associations between self‐esteem and depressive symptoms at the within‐person level, using random intercept cross‐lagged panel models (RI‐CLPMs). To get an impression of the magnitude of possible differences between the RI‐CLPM and the CLPM, we compared the results of both models. We used data from three longitudinal adolescent samples (age range: 7–18 years; study 1: N = 1948; study 2: N = 1455; study 3: N = 316). Intervals between the measurements were 1–1.5 years. Single‐paper meta‐analyses showed support for small within‐person associations from self‐esteem to depressive symptoms, but not the other way around, thus only providing some support for the vulnerability model. The cross‐lagged associations in the aggregated RI‐CLPM and CLPM showed similar effect sizes. Overall, our results show that over 1‐ to 1.5‐year time intervals, low self‐esteem may negatively influence depressive symptoms over time within adolescents, but only weakly so.

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KW - EPISODE

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KW - HOPELESSNESS

KW - PROSPECTIVELY PREDICTS DEPRESSION

KW - RANDOM-EFFECTS MODELS

KW - RISK-FACTOR

KW - TIME

KW - VULNERABILITY

KW - YOUNG ADULTHOOD

KW - depression

KW - longitudinal data

KW - random intercept cross-lagged panel model

KW - self-esteem

KW - within-person effects

U2 - 10.1002/per.2179

DO - 10.1002/per.2179

M3 - Article

VL - 32

SP - 653

EP - 671

JO - European Journal of Personality

JF - European Journal of Personality

SN - 0890-2070

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ER -