The Net Promoter Score: An asset to patient experience surveys?

M.W. Krol, D. de Boer, D. Delnoij, J.J.D.J.M. Rademakers

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleScientificpeer-review

20 Downloads (Pure)

Abstract

Background
In the search for more straightforward ways of summarizing patient experiences and satisfaction, there is growing interest in the Net Promoter Score (NPS): How likely is it that you would recommend our company to a friend or colleague?
Objective
To assess what the NPS adds to patient experience surveys. The NPS was tested against three other constructs already used in current surveys to summarize patien t experiences and satisfaction: global ratings, recommendation questions and overall scores calculated from patient experiences. To establish whether
the NPS is a valid measure for summarizing patient experiences,
its association with these experiences should be assessed.
Methods
Associations between the NPS and the three other constructs were assessed and their distributions were compared. Also, the association between the NPS and patient experiences was assessed. Data were used from patient surveys of inpatient hospital care (N = 6018) and outpatient hospital care (N = 10 902) in six Dutch hospitals.
Results
Analyses showed that the NPS was moderately to strongly correlated with the other three constructs. However, their distributions proved distinctly different. Furthermore, the patient experiences from the surveys showed weaker associations with the NPS than with the global rating and the overall score.
Conclusions
Because of the limited extent to which the NPS reflects the survey results, it seems less valid as a summary of patient experiences than a global rating, the existing recommendation question or an overall score calculated from patient experiences. In short, it is still unclear what the NPS specifically adds to
patient experience surveys
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)3099–3109
JournalHealth Expectations
Volume18
Issue number6
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2015

Fingerprint

Surveys and Questionnaires
Inpatients

Cite this

Krol, M. W., de Boer, D., Delnoij, D., & Rademakers, J. J. D. J. M. (2015). The Net Promoter Score: An asset to patient experience surveys? Health Expectations, 18(6), 3099–3109. https://doi.org/10.1111/hex.12297
Krol, M.W. ; de Boer, D. ; Delnoij, D. ; Rademakers, J.J.D.J.M. / The Net Promoter Score : An asset to patient experience surveys?. In: Health Expectations. 2015 ; Vol. 18, No. 6. pp. 3099–3109.
@article{9324e47bd61648089b8b6e3c1915710e,
title = "The Net Promoter Score: An asset to patient experience surveys?",
abstract = "Background In the search for more straightforward ways of summarizing patient experiences and satisfaction, there is growing interest in the Net Promoter Score (NPS): How likely is it that you would recommend our company to a friend or colleague?Objective To assess what the NPS adds to patient experience surveys. The NPS was tested against three other constructs already used in current surveys to summarize patien t experiences and satisfaction: global ratings, recommendation questions and overall scores calculated from patient experiences. To establish whetherthe NPS is a valid measure for summarizing patient experiences,its association with these experiences should be assessed.Methods Associations between the NPS and the three other constructs were assessed and their distributions were compared. Also, the association between the NPS and patient experiences was assessed. Data were used from patient surveys of inpatient hospital care (N = 6018) and outpatient hospital care (N = 10 902) in six Dutch hospitals.Results Analyses showed that the NPS was moderately to strongly correlated with the other three constructs. However, their distributions proved distinctly different. Furthermore, the patient experiences from the surveys showed weaker associations with the NPS than with the global rating and the overall score.Conclusions Because of the limited extent to which the NPS reflects the survey results, it seems less valid as a summary of patient experiences than a global rating, the existing recommendation question or an overall score calculated from patient experiences. In short, it is still unclear what the NPS specifically adds topatient experience surveys",
author = "M.W. Krol and {de Boer}, D. and D. Delnoij and J.J.D.J.M. Rademakers",
year = "2015",
doi = "10.1111/hex.12297",
language = "English",
volume = "18",
pages = "3099–3109",
journal = "Health Expectations",
issn = "1369-6513",
publisher = "Wiley-Blackwell",
number = "6",

}

Krol, MW, de Boer, D, Delnoij, D & Rademakers, JJDJM 2015, 'The Net Promoter Score: An asset to patient experience surveys?' Health Expectations, vol. 18, no. 6, pp. 3099–3109. https://doi.org/10.1111/hex.12297

The Net Promoter Score : An asset to patient experience surveys? / Krol, M.W.; de Boer, D.; Delnoij, D.; Rademakers, J.J.D.J.M.

In: Health Expectations, Vol. 18, No. 6, 2015, p. 3099–3109.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleScientificpeer-review

TY - JOUR

T1 - The Net Promoter Score

T2 - An asset to patient experience surveys?

AU - Krol, M.W.

AU - de Boer, D.

AU - Delnoij, D.

AU - Rademakers, J.J.D.J.M.

PY - 2015

Y1 - 2015

N2 - Background In the search for more straightforward ways of summarizing patient experiences and satisfaction, there is growing interest in the Net Promoter Score (NPS): How likely is it that you would recommend our company to a friend or colleague?Objective To assess what the NPS adds to patient experience surveys. The NPS was tested against three other constructs already used in current surveys to summarize patien t experiences and satisfaction: global ratings, recommendation questions and overall scores calculated from patient experiences. To establish whetherthe NPS is a valid measure for summarizing patient experiences,its association with these experiences should be assessed.Methods Associations between the NPS and the three other constructs were assessed and their distributions were compared. Also, the association between the NPS and patient experiences was assessed. Data were used from patient surveys of inpatient hospital care (N = 6018) and outpatient hospital care (N = 10 902) in six Dutch hospitals.Results Analyses showed that the NPS was moderately to strongly correlated with the other three constructs. However, their distributions proved distinctly different. Furthermore, the patient experiences from the surveys showed weaker associations with the NPS than with the global rating and the overall score.Conclusions Because of the limited extent to which the NPS reflects the survey results, it seems less valid as a summary of patient experiences than a global rating, the existing recommendation question or an overall score calculated from patient experiences. In short, it is still unclear what the NPS specifically adds topatient experience surveys

AB - Background In the search for more straightforward ways of summarizing patient experiences and satisfaction, there is growing interest in the Net Promoter Score (NPS): How likely is it that you would recommend our company to a friend or colleague?Objective To assess what the NPS adds to patient experience surveys. The NPS was tested against three other constructs already used in current surveys to summarize patien t experiences and satisfaction: global ratings, recommendation questions and overall scores calculated from patient experiences. To establish whetherthe NPS is a valid measure for summarizing patient experiences,its association with these experiences should be assessed.Methods Associations between the NPS and the three other constructs were assessed and their distributions were compared. Also, the association between the NPS and patient experiences was assessed. Data were used from patient surveys of inpatient hospital care (N = 6018) and outpatient hospital care (N = 10 902) in six Dutch hospitals.Results Analyses showed that the NPS was moderately to strongly correlated with the other three constructs. However, their distributions proved distinctly different. Furthermore, the patient experiences from the surveys showed weaker associations with the NPS than with the global rating and the overall score.Conclusions Because of the limited extent to which the NPS reflects the survey results, it seems less valid as a summary of patient experiences than a global rating, the existing recommendation question or an overall score calculated from patient experiences. In short, it is still unclear what the NPS specifically adds topatient experience surveys

U2 - 10.1111/hex.12297

DO - 10.1111/hex.12297

M3 - Article

VL - 18

SP - 3099

EP - 3109

JO - Health Expectations

JF - Health Expectations

SN - 1369-6513

IS - 6

ER -