The online Personal Health Check

How do Dutch citizens and professionals feel about it?

L.A.M. Van De Goor, T.J.M. Kuunders, C. Winters, L.G.M. Raaijmakers

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleScientificpeer-review

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Abstract

Four Dutch cities implemented the Personal Health Check (PHC) among their citizens last year. The PHC includes an online questionnaire and diagnostic measures, generating a personal health profile with referral to a general practitioner (GP) if needed. The PHC aims at earlier identification of defined medical risk and at encouraging people to adopt healthier lifestyles. This study focused on acceptance of the PHC among citizens and professionals.
Questions on acceptance were based on the UTAUT model by Venkatesh et al (2012) and sent online to participants. Focus group, face to face and telephone interviews were held with participants, professionals and non-responders.
Preliminary results showed response rates varying between 11 and 23%. Differences were related to the variation in manners of invitation. Invitation by the GP doubled the response rate. About 2,500 people filled in the online PHC. On average, 50% of the respondents had additional diagnostics measured. Overall, participants were positive about the PHC. It made them more conscious about their lifestyle. Some though found the PHC not easy in use. Professionals too were positive as to the awareness raised on healthy lifestyle. Contrary to their expectations, not too many ‘extra patient visits’ came up due to the PHC outcome. In addition, they wondered whether the PHC reached lower socioeconomic groups sufficiently. Main reasons for non-responding were privacy issues (directed towards municipalities mostly) and being already familiar with chronic diseases.
The online PHC seems promising in reaching large groups of people and raising awareness of health risks among them. Approach through primary care as compared to approach directly through municipalities increases acceptance and may solve privacy issues. Extra attention should be paid to simplifying PHC use and reaching lower socio economic groups at risk.
Original languageEnglish
JournalEuropean Journal of Public Health
Volume27
Issue numbersuppl.3
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Oct 2017

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Privacy
General Practitioners
Focus Groups
Interviews
Surveys and Questionnaires

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title = "The online Personal Health Check: How do Dutch citizens and professionals feel about it?",
abstract = "Four Dutch cities implemented the Personal Health Check (PHC) among their citizens last year. The PHC includes an online questionnaire and diagnostic measures, generating a personal health profile with referral to a general practitioner (GP) if needed. The PHC aims at earlier identification of defined medical risk and at encouraging people to adopt healthier lifestyles. This study focused on acceptance of the PHC among citizens and professionals.Questions on acceptance were based on the UTAUT model by Venkatesh et al (2012) and sent online to participants. Focus group, face to face and telephone interviews were held with participants, professionals and non-responders.Preliminary results showed response rates varying between 11 and 23{\%}. Differences were related to the variation in manners of invitation. Invitation by the GP doubled the response rate. About 2,500 people filled in the online PHC. On average, 50{\%} of the respondents had additional diagnostics measured. Overall, participants were positive about the PHC. It made them more conscious about their lifestyle. Some though found the PHC not easy in use. Professionals too were positive as to the awareness raised on healthy lifestyle. Contrary to their expectations, not too many ‘extra patient visits’ came up due to the PHC outcome. In addition, they wondered whether the PHC reached lower socioeconomic groups sufficiently. Main reasons for non-responding were privacy issues (directed towards municipalities mostly) and being already familiar with chronic diseases.The online PHC seems promising in reaching large groups of people and raising awareness of health risks among them. Approach through primary care as compared to approach directly through municipalities increases acceptance and may solve privacy issues. Extra attention should be paid to simplifying PHC use and reaching lower socio economic groups at risk.",
author = "{Van De Goor}, L.A.M. and T.J.M. Kuunders and C. Winters and L.G.M. Raaijmakers",
year = "2017",
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language = "English",
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journal = "European Journal of Public Health",
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The online Personal Health Check : How do Dutch citizens and professionals feel about it? / Van De Goor, L.A.M.; Kuunders, T.J.M.; Winters, C.; Raaijmakers, L.G.M.

In: European Journal of Public Health, Vol. 27, No. suppl.3, 10.2017.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleScientificpeer-review

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T1 - The online Personal Health Check

T2 - How do Dutch citizens and professionals feel about it?

AU - Van De Goor, L.A.M.

AU - Kuunders, T.J.M.

AU - Winters, C.

AU - Raaijmakers, L.G.M.

PY - 2017/10

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N2 - Four Dutch cities implemented the Personal Health Check (PHC) among their citizens last year. The PHC includes an online questionnaire and diagnostic measures, generating a personal health profile with referral to a general practitioner (GP) if needed. The PHC aims at earlier identification of defined medical risk and at encouraging people to adopt healthier lifestyles. This study focused on acceptance of the PHC among citizens and professionals.Questions on acceptance were based on the UTAUT model by Venkatesh et al (2012) and sent online to participants. Focus group, face to face and telephone interviews were held with participants, professionals and non-responders.Preliminary results showed response rates varying between 11 and 23%. Differences were related to the variation in manners of invitation. Invitation by the GP doubled the response rate. About 2,500 people filled in the online PHC. On average, 50% of the respondents had additional diagnostics measured. Overall, participants were positive about the PHC. It made them more conscious about their lifestyle. Some though found the PHC not easy in use. Professionals too were positive as to the awareness raised on healthy lifestyle. Contrary to their expectations, not too many ‘extra patient visits’ came up due to the PHC outcome. In addition, they wondered whether the PHC reached lower socioeconomic groups sufficiently. Main reasons for non-responding were privacy issues (directed towards municipalities mostly) and being already familiar with chronic diseases.The online PHC seems promising in reaching large groups of people and raising awareness of health risks among them. Approach through primary care as compared to approach directly through municipalities increases acceptance and may solve privacy issues. Extra attention should be paid to simplifying PHC use and reaching lower socio economic groups at risk.

AB - Four Dutch cities implemented the Personal Health Check (PHC) among their citizens last year. The PHC includes an online questionnaire and diagnostic measures, generating a personal health profile with referral to a general practitioner (GP) if needed. The PHC aims at earlier identification of defined medical risk and at encouraging people to adopt healthier lifestyles. This study focused on acceptance of the PHC among citizens and professionals.Questions on acceptance were based on the UTAUT model by Venkatesh et al (2012) and sent online to participants. Focus group, face to face and telephone interviews were held with participants, professionals and non-responders.Preliminary results showed response rates varying between 11 and 23%. Differences were related to the variation in manners of invitation. Invitation by the GP doubled the response rate. About 2,500 people filled in the online PHC. On average, 50% of the respondents had additional diagnostics measured. Overall, participants were positive about the PHC. It made them more conscious about their lifestyle. Some though found the PHC not easy in use. Professionals too were positive as to the awareness raised on healthy lifestyle. Contrary to their expectations, not too many ‘extra patient visits’ came up due to the PHC outcome. In addition, they wondered whether the PHC reached lower socioeconomic groups sufficiently. Main reasons for non-responding were privacy issues (directed towards municipalities mostly) and being already familiar with chronic diseases.The online PHC seems promising in reaching large groups of people and raising awareness of health risks among them. Approach through primary care as compared to approach directly through municipalities increases acceptance and may solve privacy issues. Extra attention should be paid to simplifying PHC use and reaching lower socio economic groups at risk.

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