The Political Feasibility of Increasing Retirement Age

Lessons from a Ballot on Female Retirement Age

M. Butler

Research output: Working paperDiscussion paperOther research output

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Abstract

In 1998, the Swiss voters approved of an increase in female retirement age from 62 to 64.The referendum, being on a single issue only, offers a unique opportunity to explore the political feasibility of pension reforms and to apply theoretical models of life-cycle decision making.Estimates carried out with municipality data suggest that the outcome of the vote conforms relatively well with predictions drawn from a theoretical simulation study.There are, however, surprising gender differences even in married couples.Young agents, married middle-aged and all elderly men favor an increase in female retirement age, while middle-aged and elderly women strongly oppose it.Richer communities and those with a high proportion of self-employed or a low fraction of blue-collar workers are more likely to opt for a higher retirement age.Ideological preferences and regional differences also play a considerable role.
Original languageEnglish
Place of PublicationTilburg
PublisherMacroeconomics
Number of pages36
Volume2000-121
Publication statusPublished - 2000

Publication series

NameCentER Discussion Paper
Volume2000-121

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Political feasibility
Retirement age
Gender differences
Blue-collar workers
Prediction
Pension reform
Referendum
Regional differences
Life cycle
Decision making
Simulation study
Vote
Proportion
Municipalities
Voters

Keywords

  • retirement
  • female workers
  • decision making

Cite this

Butler, M. (2000). The Political Feasibility of Increasing Retirement Age: Lessons from a Ballot on Female Retirement Age. (CentER Discussion Paper; Vol. 2000-121). Tilburg: Macroeconomics.
Butler, M. / The Political Feasibility of Increasing Retirement Age : Lessons from a Ballot on Female Retirement Age. Tilburg : Macroeconomics, 2000. (CentER Discussion Paper).
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Butler, M 2000 'The Political Feasibility of Increasing Retirement Age: Lessons from a Ballot on Female Retirement Age' CentER Discussion Paper, vol. 2000-121, Macroeconomics, Tilburg.

The Political Feasibility of Increasing Retirement Age : Lessons from a Ballot on Female Retirement Age. / Butler, M.

Tilburg : Macroeconomics, 2000. (CentER Discussion Paper; Vol. 2000-121).

Research output: Working paperDiscussion paperOther research output

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Butler M. The Political Feasibility of Increasing Retirement Age: Lessons from a Ballot on Female Retirement Age. Tilburg: Macroeconomics. 2000. (CentER Discussion Paper).