The relationship between parenting stress and parent–child interaction with health outcomes in the youngest patients with type 1 diabetes (0–7 years)

A.M. Nieuwesteeg, E.E. Hartman, H.J. Aanstoot, H.J.A. van Bakel, W.H.M. Emons, E. van Mil, F. Pouwer

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleScientificpeer-review

Abstract

To test whether parenting stress and the quality of parent–child interaction were associated with glycemic control and quality of life (QoL) in young children (0–7 years) with type 1 diabetes (T1DM), we videotaped 77 families with a young child with T1DM during mealtime (including glucose monitoring and insulin administration). Parent–child interactions were scored with a specifically designed instrument. Questionnaires assessed general and disease-related parenting stress and (diabetes-specific (DS)) QoL. HbA1c (glycemic control) was extracted from the medical records. Both general and disease-related parenting stress were associated with a lower (DS)QoL (r ranged from −0.39 to −0.70, p < 0.05), but not with HbA1c levels. Furthermore, with regard to the parent–child interaction, emotional involvement of parents (r = 0.23, p < 0.05) and expressed discomfort of the child (r = 0.23, p < 0.05) were related to suboptimal HbA1c levels. There was no clear pattern in the correlations between parent–child interaction and (DS)QoL. Conclusion: The results support the notion that diabetes does not only affect the child with T1DM: T1DM is a family disease, as parenting factors (like stress and parent–child interactions) are associated with important child outcomes. Therefore, it is important for health-care providers to not only focus on the child with T1DM, but also on the family system. Keywords: Type 1 diabetes ,Parent–child interaction, Behavior, Children, Parents
LanguageEnglish
Pages329-338
JournalEuropean Journal of Pediatrics
Volume175
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - 2016

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Parenting
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@article{69ceda8f90cb442f802aa78085f997f8,
title = "The relationship between parenting stress and parent–child interaction with health outcomes in the youngest patients with type 1 diabetes (0–7 years)",
abstract = "To test whether parenting stress and the quality of parent–child interaction were associated with glycemic control and quality of life (QoL) in young children (0–7 years) with type 1 diabetes (T1DM), we videotaped 77 families with a young child with T1DM during mealtime (including glucose monitoring and insulin administration). Parent–child interactions were scored with a specifically designed instrument. Questionnaires assessed general and disease-related parenting stress and (diabetes-specific (DS)) QoL. HbA1c (glycemic control) was extracted from the medical records. Both general and disease-related parenting stress were associated with a lower (DS)QoL (r ranged from −0.39 to −0.70, p < 0.05), but not with HbA1c levels. Furthermore, with regard to the parent–child interaction, emotional involvement of parents (r = 0.23, p < 0.05) and expressed discomfort of the child (r = 0.23, p < 0.05) were related to suboptimal HbA1c levels. There was no clear pattern in the correlations between parent–child interaction and (DS)QoL. Conclusion: The results support the notion that diabetes does not only affect the child with T1DM: T1DM is a family disease, as parenting factors (like stress and parent–child interactions) are associated with important child outcomes. Therefore, it is important for health-care providers to not only focus on the child with T1DM, but also on the family system. Keywords: Type 1 diabetes ,Parent–child interaction, Behavior, Children, Parents",
author = "A.M. Nieuwesteeg and E.E. Hartman and H.J. Aanstoot and {van Bakel}, H.J.A. and W.H.M. Emons and {van Mil}, E. and F. Pouwer",
year = "2016",
doi = "10.1007/s00431-015-2631-4",
language = "English",
volume = "175",
pages = "329--338",
journal = "European Journal of Pediatrics",
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}

The relationship between parenting stress and parent–child interaction with health outcomes in the youngest patients with type 1 diabetes (0–7 years). / Nieuwesteeg, A.M.; Hartman, E.E.; Aanstoot, H.J.; van Bakel, H.J.A.; Emons, W.H.M.; van Mil, E.; Pouwer, F.

In: European Journal of Pediatrics, Vol. 175, No. 3, 2016, p. 329-338.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleScientificpeer-review

TY - JOUR

T1 - The relationship between parenting stress and parent–child interaction with health outcomes in the youngest patients with type 1 diabetes (0–7 years)

AU - Nieuwesteeg,A.M.

AU - Hartman,E.E.

AU - Aanstoot,H.J.

AU - van Bakel,H.J.A.

AU - Emons,W.H.M.

AU - van Mil,E.

AU - Pouwer,F.

PY - 2016

Y1 - 2016

N2 - To test whether parenting stress and the quality of parent–child interaction were associated with glycemic control and quality of life (QoL) in young children (0–7 years) with type 1 diabetes (T1DM), we videotaped 77 families with a young child with T1DM during mealtime (including glucose monitoring and insulin administration). Parent–child interactions were scored with a specifically designed instrument. Questionnaires assessed general and disease-related parenting stress and (diabetes-specific (DS)) QoL. HbA1c (glycemic control) was extracted from the medical records. Both general and disease-related parenting stress were associated with a lower (DS)QoL (r ranged from −0.39 to −0.70, p < 0.05), but not with HbA1c levels. Furthermore, with regard to the parent–child interaction, emotional involvement of parents (r = 0.23, p < 0.05) and expressed discomfort of the child (r = 0.23, p < 0.05) were related to suboptimal HbA1c levels. There was no clear pattern in the correlations between parent–child interaction and (DS)QoL. Conclusion: The results support the notion that diabetes does not only affect the child with T1DM: T1DM is a family disease, as parenting factors (like stress and parent–child interactions) are associated with important child outcomes. Therefore, it is important for health-care providers to not only focus on the child with T1DM, but also on the family system. Keywords: Type 1 diabetes ,Parent–child interaction, Behavior, Children, Parents

AB - To test whether parenting stress and the quality of parent–child interaction were associated with glycemic control and quality of life (QoL) in young children (0–7 years) with type 1 diabetes (T1DM), we videotaped 77 families with a young child with T1DM during mealtime (including glucose monitoring and insulin administration). Parent–child interactions were scored with a specifically designed instrument. Questionnaires assessed general and disease-related parenting stress and (diabetes-specific (DS)) QoL. HbA1c (glycemic control) was extracted from the medical records. Both general and disease-related parenting stress were associated with a lower (DS)QoL (r ranged from −0.39 to −0.70, p < 0.05), but not with HbA1c levels. Furthermore, with regard to the parent–child interaction, emotional involvement of parents (r = 0.23, p < 0.05) and expressed discomfort of the child (r = 0.23, p < 0.05) were related to suboptimal HbA1c levels. There was no clear pattern in the correlations between parent–child interaction and (DS)QoL. Conclusion: The results support the notion that diabetes does not only affect the child with T1DM: T1DM is a family disease, as parenting factors (like stress and parent–child interactions) are associated with important child outcomes. Therefore, it is important for health-care providers to not only focus on the child with T1DM, but also on the family system. Keywords: Type 1 diabetes ,Parent–child interaction, Behavior, Children, Parents

U2 - 10.1007/s00431-015-2631-4

DO - 10.1007/s00431-015-2631-4

M3 - Article

VL - 175

SP - 329

EP - 338

JO - European Journal of Pediatrics

T2 - European Journal of Pediatrics

JF - European Journal of Pediatrics

SN - 0340-6199

IS - 3

ER -