The role of change readiness and colleague support in the role stressors and withdrawal behaviors relationship among health care employees

Denis Chênevert, Steven Kilroy, Janine Bosak

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleScientificpeer-review

Abstract

Purpose
The purpose of this paper is to investigate the impact of role stressors (role ambiguity, role conflict and role overload) on change readiness and in turn their effects on the withdrawal process. In addition, it explores the moderating role of colleague support in the relationship between role stressors and change readiness.

Design/methodology/approach
Data were collected from health care workers (n=457) in a large Canadian hospital undergoing large scale change.

Findings
The results revealed that role ambiguity and role conflict had a significant negative association with change readiness. Change readiness was related to turnover intentions which was related to higher levels of absenteeism and actual turnover. Change readiness partially mediated the relationship between role ambiguity and turnover intentions but not for role conflict and role overload. Turnover intentions partially mediated the relationship between change readiness and actual turnover but not for absenteeism. Role conflict had a direct rather than an indirect effect via change readiness on turnover intentions. Finally, colleague support moderated the relationship between all three role stressors and change readiness.

Originality/value
Little is known about the limiting factors of change as well as the factors that protect against them. The authors identify role stressors as a limiting factor for change and highlight their impact on change readiness and the overall withdrawal process. The results, however, also show that some demands are more commonly experienced by health care workers thereby not posing a threat to their change readiness. Colleague support is identified as a coping mechanism for mitigating against the detrimental effects of role stressors.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)208-223
JournalJournal of Organizational Change Management
Volume32
Issue number2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2019

Fingerprint

Health care
Personnel
Healthcare
Readiness
Employees
Role stressors

Keywords

  • ABSENTEEISM
  • BURNOUT
  • COMMITMENT
  • CONSERVATION
  • Change readiness
  • Colleague support
  • Health care sector
  • ORGANIZATIONAL-CHANGE
  • RESOURCES
  • ROLE AMBIGUITY
  • ROLE-CONFLICT
  • Role stressors
  • SOCIAL SUPPORT
  • TURNOVER
  • Withdrawal process

Cite this

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abstract = "PurposeThe purpose of this paper is to investigate the impact of role stressors (role ambiguity, role conflict and role overload) on change readiness and in turn their effects on the withdrawal process. In addition, it explores the moderating role of colleague support in the relationship between role stressors and change readiness.Design/methodology/approachData were collected from health care workers (n=457) in a large Canadian hospital undergoing large scale change.FindingsThe results revealed that role ambiguity and role conflict had a significant negative association with change readiness. Change readiness was related to turnover intentions which was related to higher levels of absenteeism and actual turnover. Change readiness partially mediated the relationship between role ambiguity and turnover intentions but not for role conflict and role overload. Turnover intentions partially mediated the relationship between change readiness and actual turnover but not for absenteeism. Role conflict had a direct rather than an indirect effect via change readiness on turnover intentions. Finally, colleague support moderated the relationship between all three role stressors and change readiness.Originality/valueLittle is known about the limiting factors of change as well as the factors that protect against them. The authors identify role stressors as a limiting factor for change and highlight their impact on change readiness and the overall withdrawal process. The results, however, also show that some demands are more commonly experienced by health care workers thereby not posing a threat to their change readiness. Colleague support is identified as a coping mechanism for mitigating against the detrimental effects of role stressors.",
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The role of change readiness and colleague support in the role stressors and withdrawal behaviors relationship among health care employees. / Chênevert, Denis; Kilroy, Steven; Bosak, Janine.

In: Journal of Organizational Change Management, Vol. 32, No. 2, 2019, p. 208-223.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleScientificpeer-review

TY - JOUR

T1 - The role of change readiness and colleague support in the role stressors and withdrawal behaviors relationship among health care employees

AU - Chênevert, Denis

AU - Kilroy, Steven

AU - Bosak, Janine

PY - 2019

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AB - PurposeThe purpose of this paper is to investigate the impact of role stressors (role ambiguity, role conflict and role overload) on change readiness and in turn their effects on the withdrawal process. In addition, it explores the moderating role of colleague support in the relationship between role stressors and change readiness.Design/methodology/approachData were collected from health care workers (n=457) in a large Canadian hospital undergoing large scale change.FindingsThe results revealed that role ambiguity and role conflict had a significant negative association with change readiness. Change readiness was related to turnover intentions which was related to higher levels of absenteeism and actual turnover. Change readiness partially mediated the relationship between role ambiguity and turnover intentions but not for role conflict and role overload. Turnover intentions partially mediated the relationship between change readiness and actual turnover but not for absenteeism. Role conflict had a direct rather than an indirect effect via change readiness on turnover intentions. Finally, colleague support moderated the relationship between all three role stressors and change readiness.Originality/valueLittle is known about the limiting factors of change as well as the factors that protect against them. The authors identify role stressors as a limiting factor for change and highlight their impact on change readiness and the overall withdrawal process. The results, however, also show that some demands are more commonly experienced by health care workers thereby not posing a threat to their change readiness. Colleague support is identified as a coping mechanism for mitigating against the detrimental effects of role stressors.

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KW - CONSERVATION

KW - Change readiness

KW - Colleague support

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KW - ORGANIZATIONAL-CHANGE

KW - RESOURCES

KW - ROLE AMBIGUITY

KW - ROLE-CONFLICT

KW - Role stressors

KW - SOCIAL SUPPORT

KW - TURNOVER

KW - Withdrawal process

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JO - Journal of Organizational Change Management

JF - Journal of Organizational Change Management

SN - 0953-4814

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