The role of perceived cultural distance, personal growth initiative, language proficiencies, and tridimensional acculturation orientations for psychological adjustment among international students

Jitka Tausova, Michael Bender, Radosveta Dimitrova, Fons van de Vijver

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleScientificpeer-review

Abstract

We investigated the acculturation process of international students (N = 319, 162 female) from 62 countries who were residing in the Netherlands, using the acculturation framework by Arends-Toth and Van de Vijver (2007). We applied SEM to test the model that acculturation conditions (perceived cultural distance (PCD], personal growth initiative [PGI], proficiency in English and the host language, and length of residence) in conjunction with acculturation orientations as mediators (host, heritage, expatriate) predict psychological adjustment as acculturation outcome (acculturative stress, satisfaction with life, mental health problems). We found direct and indirect effects of acculturation conditions on adjustment; high PGI, high English and Dutch proficiencies, and low PCD were associated with better adjustment Host orientation (predicted by high PGI, Dutch proficiency, and low PCD) was positively associated with adjustment. Heritage orientation (predicted by low English proficiency) was negatively associated with adjustment. As a novel aspect, we included expatriate orientation - an orientation towards other expatriates in the host community. Expatriate orientation was predicted by low Dutch proficiency and was positively associated with adjustment. We also observed direct links between acculturation conditions and outcomes: positive associations between PCD and acculturative stress and between length of residence and acculturative stress; and negative associations between PGI and mental health problems and between English proficiency and acculturative stress. We provide evidence that including expatriate orientation is relevant among international students: It is stronger than both host and heritage orientations, thereby underlining the importance of studying acculturation in a contextualized way.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)11-23
JournalInternational Journal of Intercultural Relations
Volume69
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2019

Keywords

  • Tridimensional acculturation
  • International students
  • Acculturation orientations
  • Perceived cultural distance
  • Personal growth initiative
  • Psychological adjustment
  • SOCIOCULTURAL ADJUSTMENT
  • MULTICULTURAL PERSONALITY
  • EXCHANGE STUDENTS
  • MENTAL-HEALTH
  • STRESS
  • ATTITUDES
  • ADAPTATION
  • OVERSEAS
  • SCALE
  • SATISFACTION

Cite this

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title = "The role of perceived cultural distance, personal growth initiative, language proficiencies, and tridimensional acculturation orientations for psychological adjustment among international students",
abstract = "We investigated the acculturation process of international students (N = 319, 162 female) from 62 countries who were residing in the Netherlands, using the acculturation framework by Arends-Toth and Van de Vijver (2007). We applied SEM to test the model that acculturation conditions (perceived cultural distance (PCD], personal growth initiative [PGI], proficiency in English and the host language, and length of residence) in conjunction with acculturation orientations as mediators (host, heritage, expatriate) predict psychological adjustment as acculturation outcome (acculturative stress, satisfaction with life, mental health problems). We found direct and indirect effects of acculturation conditions on adjustment; high PGI, high English and Dutch proficiencies, and low PCD were associated with better adjustment Host orientation (predicted by high PGI, Dutch proficiency, and low PCD) was positively associated with adjustment. Heritage orientation (predicted by low English proficiency) was negatively associated with adjustment. As a novel aspect, we included expatriate orientation - an orientation towards other expatriates in the host community. Expatriate orientation was predicted by low Dutch proficiency and was positively associated with adjustment. We also observed direct links between acculturation conditions and outcomes: positive associations between PCD and acculturative stress and between length of residence and acculturative stress; and negative associations between PGI and mental health problems and between English proficiency and acculturative stress. We provide evidence that including expatriate orientation is relevant among international students: It is stronger than both host and heritage orientations, thereby underlining the importance of studying acculturation in a contextualized way.",
keywords = "Tridimensional acculturation, International students, Acculturation orientations, Perceived cultural distance, Personal growth initiative, Psychological adjustment, SOCIOCULTURAL ADJUSTMENT, MULTICULTURAL PERSONALITY, EXCHANGE STUDENTS, MENTAL-HEALTH, STRESS, ATTITUDES, ADAPTATION, OVERSEAS, SCALE, SATISFACTION",
author = "Jitka Tausova and Michael Bender and Radosveta Dimitrova and {van de Vijver}, Fons",
year = "2019",
doi = "10.1016/j.ijintrel.2018.11.004",
language = "English",
volume = "69",
pages = "11--23",
journal = "International Journal of Intercultural Relations",
issn = "0147-1767",
publisher = "PERGAMON-ELSEVIER SCIENCE LTD",

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The role of perceived cultural distance, personal growth initiative, language proficiencies, and tridimensional acculturation orientations for psychological adjustment among international students. / Tausova, Jitka; Bender, Michael; Dimitrova, Radosveta; van de Vijver, Fons.

In: International Journal of Intercultural Relations, Vol. 69, 2019, p. 11-23.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleScientificpeer-review

TY - JOUR

T1 - The role of perceived cultural distance, personal growth initiative, language proficiencies, and tridimensional acculturation orientations for psychological adjustment among international students

AU - Tausova, Jitka

AU - Bender, Michael

AU - Dimitrova, Radosveta

AU - van de Vijver, Fons

PY - 2019

Y1 - 2019

N2 - We investigated the acculturation process of international students (N = 319, 162 female) from 62 countries who were residing in the Netherlands, using the acculturation framework by Arends-Toth and Van de Vijver (2007). We applied SEM to test the model that acculturation conditions (perceived cultural distance (PCD], personal growth initiative [PGI], proficiency in English and the host language, and length of residence) in conjunction with acculturation orientations as mediators (host, heritage, expatriate) predict psychological adjustment as acculturation outcome (acculturative stress, satisfaction with life, mental health problems). We found direct and indirect effects of acculturation conditions on adjustment; high PGI, high English and Dutch proficiencies, and low PCD were associated with better adjustment Host orientation (predicted by high PGI, Dutch proficiency, and low PCD) was positively associated with adjustment. Heritage orientation (predicted by low English proficiency) was negatively associated with adjustment. As a novel aspect, we included expatriate orientation - an orientation towards other expatriates in the host community. Expatriate orientation was predicted by low Dutch proficiency and was positively associated with adjustment. We also observed direct links between acculturation conditions and outcomes: positive associations between PCD and acculturative stress and between length of residence and acculturative stress; and negative associations between PGI and mental health problems and between English proficiency and acculturative stress. We provide evidence that including expatriate orientation is relevant among international students: It is stronger than both host and heritage orientations, thereby underlining the importance of studying acculturation in a contextualized way.

AB - We investigated the acculturation process of international students (N = 319, 162 female) from 62 countries who were residing in the Netherlands, using the acculturation framework by Arends-Toth and Van de Vijver (2007). We applied SEM to test the model that acculturation conditions (perceived cultural distance (PCD], personal growth initiative [PGI], proficiency in English and the host language, and length of residence) in conjunction with acculturation orientations as mediators (host, heritage, expatriate) predict psychological adjustment as acculturation outcome (acculturative stress, satisfaction with life, mental health problems). We found direct and indirect effects of acculturation conditions on adjustment; high PGI, high English and Dutch proficiencies, and low PCD were associated with better adjustment Host orientation (predicted by high PGI, Dutch proficiency, and low PCD) was positively associated with adjustment. Heritage orientation (predicted by low English proficiency) was negatively associated with adjustment. As a novel aspect, we included expatriate orientation - an orientation towards other expatriates in the host community. Expatriate orientation was predicted by low Dutch proficiency and was positively associated with adjustment. We also observed direct links between acculturation conditions and outcomes: positive associations between PCD and acculturative stress and between length of residence and acculturative stress; and negative associations between PGI and mental health problems and between English proficiency and acculturative stress. We provide evidence that including expatriate orientation is relevant among international students: It is stronger than both host and heritage orientations, thereby underlining the importance of studying acculturation in a contextualized way.

KW - Tridimensional acculturation

KW - International students

KW - Acculturation orientations

KW - Perceived cultural distance

KW - Personal growth initiative

KW - Psychological adjustment

KW - SOCIOCULTURAL ADJUSTMENT

KW - MULTICULTURAL PERSONALITY

KW - EXCHANGE STUDENTS

KW - MENTAL-HEALTH

KW - STRESS

KW - ATTITUDES

KW - ADAPTATION

KW - OVERSEAS

KW - SCALE

KW - SATISFACTION

U2 - 10.1016/j.ijintrel.2018.11.004

DO - 10.1016/j.ijintrel.2018.11.004

M3 - Article

VL - 69

SP - 11

EP - 23

JO - International Journal of Intercultural Relations

JF - International Journal of Intercultural Relations

SN - 0147-1767

ER -