The role of stress reactivity in the long-term persistence of adolescent social anxiety symptoms

S. A. Nelemans*, W. W. Hale, S. J. T. Branje, P. A. C. van Lier, H. M. Koot, W.H.J. Meeus

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleScientificpeer-review

Abstract

Social Anxiety Disorder (SAD) symptoms demonstrate a marked persistence over time, but little is known empirically about short-term processes that may account for this long-term persistence. In this study, we examined how self-reported and physiological stress reactivity were associated with persistence of SAD symptoms from early to late adolescence. A community sample of 327 adolescents (56% boys, M-age = 13.01 at T-1) reported their SAD symptoms for 6 successive years and participated in a public speaking task, during which self-reported (i.e., perceived nervousness and heart rate) and physiological (i.e., cortisol and heart rate) measures of stress were taken. Overall, our results point to a developmental process in which adolescents with a developmental history of higher SAD symptoms show both heightened perceived stress reactivity and heart rate reactivity, which, in turn, predict higher SAD symptoms into late adolescence. (C) 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)91-104
JournalBiological Psychology
Volume125
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Apr 2017

Keywords

  • Social anxiety disorder (SAD) symptoms
  • Adolescence
  • Stress reactivity
  • Developmental processes
  • Public speaking task
  • COMORBIDITY SURVEY REPLICATION
  • DSM-IV DISORDERS
  • PSYCHOMETRIC PROPERTIES
  • INTERNALIZING PROBLEMS
  • AUTONOMIC FLEXIBILITY
  • LIFETIME PREVALENCE
  • GENERAL-POPULATION
  • EMOTION EXPERIENCE
  • ANXIOUS CHILDREN
  • PUBLIC SPEAKING

Cite this

Nelemans, S. A., Hale, W. W., Branje, S. J. T., van Lier, P. A. C., Koot, H. M., & Meeus, W. H. J. (2017). The role of stress reactivity in the long-term persistence of adolescent social anxiety symptoms. Biological Psychology, 125, 91-104. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.biopsycho.2017.03.003
Nelemans, S. A. ; Hale, W. W. ; Branje, S. J. T. ; van Lier, P. A. C. ; Koot, H. M. ; Meeus, W.H.J. / The role of stress reactivity in the long-term persistence of adolescent social anxiety symptoms. In: Biological Psychology. 2017 ; Vol. 125. pp. 91-104.
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The role of stress reactivity in the long-term persistence of adolescent social anxiety symptoms. / Nelemans, S. A.; Hale, W. W.; Branje, S. J. T.; van Lier, P. A. C.; Koot, H. M.; Meeus, W.H.J.

In: Biological Psychology, Vol. 125, 04.2017, p. 91-104.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleScientificpeer-review

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AB - Social Anxiety Disorder (SAD) symptoms demonstrate a marked persistence over time, but little is known empirically about short-term processes that may account for this long-term persistence. In this study, we examined how self-reported and physiological stress reactivity were associated with persistence of SAD symptoms from early to late adolescence. A community sample of 327 adolescents (56% boys, M-age = 13.01 at T-1) reported their SAD symptoms for 6 successive years and participated in a public speaking task, during which self-reported (i.e., perceived nervousness and heart rate) and physiological (i.e., cortisol and heart rate) measures of stress were taken. Overall, our results point to a developmental process in which adolescents with a developmental history of higher SAD symptoms show both heightened perceived stress reactivity and heart rate reactivity, which, in turn, predict higher SAD symptoms into late adolescence. (C) 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

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