The world at 7:00

Comparing the experience of situations across 20 countries

Esther Guillaume, Erica Baranski, Elysia Todd, Brock Bastian, Igor Bronin, Christina Ivanova, Joey T. Cheng, Francois S. de Kock, J. J.A. Denissen, David Gallardo-Pujol, Peter Halama, Gyuseog Q. Han, Jaechang Bae, Jungsoon Moon, Ryan Y. Hong, Martina Hrebickova, Sylvie Graf, Pawel Izdebski, Lars Lundmann, Lars Penke & 13 others Marco Perugini, Giulio Costantini, John Rauthmann, Matthias Ziegler, Anu Realo, Liisalotte Elme, Tatsuya Sato, Shizuka Kawamoto, Piotr Szarota, Jessica L. Tracy, Marcel A. G. van Aken, Yu Yang, David C. Funder*

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleScientificpeer-review

Abstract

The purpose of this research is to quantitatively compare everyday situational experience around the world. Local collaborators recruited 5,447 members of college communities in 20 countries, who provided data via a Web site in 14 languages. Using the 89 items of the Riverside Situational Q-sort (RSQ), participants described the situation they experienced the previous evening at 7:00 p.m. Correlations among the average situational profiles of each country ranged from r = .73 to r=.95; the typical situation was described as largely pleasant. Most similar were the United States/Canada; least similar were South Korea/Denmark. Japan had the most homogenous situational experience; South Korea, the least. The 15 RSQ items varying the most across countries described relatively negative aspects of situational experience; the 15 least varying items were more positive. Further analyses correlated RSQ items with national scores on six value dimensions, the Big Five traits, economic output, and population. Individualism, Neuroticism, Openness, and Gross Domestic Product yielded more significant correlations than expected by chance. Psychological research traditionally has paid more attention to the assessment of persons than of situations, a discrepancy that extends to cross-cultural psychology. The present study demonstrates how cultures vary in situational experience in psychologically meaningful ways.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)493-509
JournalJournal of Personality
Volume84
Issue number4
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2016

Keywords

  • NATIONAL CHARACTER
  • UNITED-STATES
  • PERSONALITY
  • CULTURES
  • PSYCHOLOGY
  • BEHAVIOR
  • EXPRESSION
  • UNIVERSAL
  • PEOPLE
  • JAPAN

Cite this

Guillaume, E., Baranski, E., Todd, E., Bastian, B., Bronin, I., Ivanova, C., ... Funder, D. C. (2016). The world at 7:00: Comparing the experience of situations across 20 countries. Journal of Personality, 84(4), 493-509. https://doi.org/10.1111/jopy.12176
Guillaume, Esther ; Baranski, Erica ; Todd, Elysia ; Bastian, Brock ; Bronin, Igor ; Ivanova, Christina ; Cheng, Joey T. ; de Kock, Francois S. ; Denissen, J. J.A. ; Gallardo-Pujol, David ; Halama, Peter ; Han, Gyuseog Q. ; Bae, Jaechang ; Moon, Jungsoon ; Hong, Ryan Y. ; Hrebickova, Martina ; Graf, Sylvie ; Izdebski, Pawel ; Lundmann, Lars ; Penke, Lars ; Perugini, Marco ; Costantini, Giulio ; Rauthmann, John ; Ziegler, Matthias ; Realo, Anu ; Elme, Liisalotte ; Sato, Tatsuya ; Kawamoto, Shizuka ; Szarota, Piotr ; Tracy, Jessica L. ; van Aken, Marcel A. G. ; Yang, Yu ; Funder, David C. / The world at 7:00 : Comparing the experience of situations across 20 countries. In: Journal of Personality. 2016 ; Vol. 84, No. 4. pp. 493-509.
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abstract = "The purpose of this research is to quantitatively compare everyday situational experience around the world. Local collaborators recruited 5,447 members of college communities in 20 countries, who provided data via a Web site in 14 languages. Using the 89 items of the Riverside Situational Q-sort (RSQ), participants described the situation they experienced the previous evening at 7:00 p.m. Correlations among the average situational profiles of each country ranged from r = .73 to r=.95; the typical situation was described as largely pleasant. Most similar were the United States/Canada; least similar were South Korea/Denmark. Japan had the most homogenous situational experience; South Korea, the least. The 15 RSQ items varying the most across countries described relatively negative aspects of situational experience; the 15 least varying items were more positive. Further analyses correlated RSQ items with national scores on six value dimensions, the Big Five traits, economic output, and population. Individualism, Neuroticism, Openness, and Gross Domestic Product yielded more significant correlations than expected by chance. Psychological research traditionally has paid more attention to the assessment of persons than of situations, a discrepancy that extends to cross-cultural psychology. The present study demonstrates how cultures vary in situational experience in psychologically meaningful ways.",
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author = "Esther Guillaume and Erica Baranski and Elysia Todd and Brock Bastian and Igor Bronin and Christina Ivanova and Cheng, {Joey T.} and {de Kock}, {Francois S.} and Denissen, {J. J.A.} and David Gallardo-Pujol and Peter Halama and Han, {Gyuseog Q.} and Jaechang Bae and Jungsoon Moon and Hong, {Ryan Y.} and Martina Hrebickova and Sylvie Graf and Pawel Izdebski and Lars Lundmann and Lars Penke and Marco Perugini and Giulio Costantini and John Rauthmann and Matthias Ziegler and Anu Realo and Liisalotte Elme and Tatsuya Sato and Shizuka Kawamoto and Piotr Szarota and Tracy, {Jessica L.} and {van Aken}, {Marcel A. G.} and Yu Yang and Funder, {David C.}",
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Guillaume, E, Baranski, E, Todd, E, Bastian, B, Bronin, I, Ivanova, C, Cheng, JT, de Kock, FS, Denissen, JJA, Gallardo-Pujol, D, Halama, P, Han, GQ, Bae, J, Moon, J, Hong, RY, Hrebickova, M, Graf, S, Izdebski, P, Lundmann, L, Penke, L, Perugini, M, Costantini, G, Rauthmann, J, Ziegler, M, Realo, A, Elme, L, Sato, T, Kawamoto, S, Szarota, P, Tracy, JL, van Aken, MAG, Yang, Y & Funder, DC 2016, 'The world at 7:00: Comparing the experience of situations across 20 countries', Journal of Personality, vol. 84, no. 4, pp. 493-509. https://doi.org/10.1111/jopy.12176

The world at 7:00 : Comparing the experience of situations across 20 countries. / Guillaume, Esther; Baranski, Erica; Todd, Elysia; Bastian, Brock; Bronin, Igor; Ivanova, Christina; Cheng, Joey T.; de Kock, Francois S.; Denissen, J. J.A.; Gallardo-Pujol, David; Halama, Peter; Han, Gyuseog Q.; Bae, Jaechang; Moon, Jungsoon; Hong, Ryan Y.; Hrebickova, Martina; Graf, Sylvie; Izdebski, Pawel; Lundmann, Lars; Penke, Lars; Perugini, Marco; Costantini, Giulio; Rauthmann, John; Ziegler, Matthias; Realo, Anu; Elme, Liisalotte; Sato, Tatsuya; Kawamoto, Shizuka; Szarota, Piotr; Tracy, Jessica L.; van Aken, Marcel A. G.; Yang, Yu; Funder, David C.

In: Journal of Personality, Vol. 84, No. 4, 2016, p. 493-509.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleScientificpeer-review

TY - JOUR

T1 - The world at 7:00

T2 - Comparing the experience of situations across 20 countries

AU - Guillaume, Esther

AU - Baranski, Erica

AU - Todd, Elysia

AU - Bastian, Brock

AU - Bronin, Igor

AU - Ivanova, Christina

AU - Cheng, Joey T.

AU - de Kock, Francois S.

AU - Denissen, J. J.A.

AU - Gallardo-Pujol, David

AU - Halama, Peter

AU - Han, Gyuseog Q.

AU - Bae, Jaechang

AU - Moon, Jungsoon

AU - Hong, Ryan Y.

AU - Hrebickova, Martina

AU - Graf, Sylvie

AU - Izdebski, Pawel

AU - Lundmann, Lars

AU - Penke, Lars

AU - Perugini, Marco

AU - Costantini, Giulio

AU - Rauthmann, John

AU - Ziegler, Matthias

AU - Realo, Anu

AU - Elme, Liisalotte

AU - Sato, Tatsuya

AU - Kawamoto, Shizuka

AU - Szarota, Piotr

AU - Tracy, Jessica L.

AU - van Aken, Marcel A. G.

AU - Yang, Yu

AU - Funder, David C.

PY - 2016

Y1 - 2016

N2 - The purpose of this research is to quantitatively compare everyday situational experience around the world. Local collaborators recruited 5,447 members of college communities in 20 countries, who provided data via a Web site in 14 languages. Using the 89 items of the Riverside Situational Q-sort (RSQ), participants described the situation they experienced the previous evening at 7:00 p.m. Correlations among the average situational profiles of each country ranged from r = .73 to r=.95; the typical situation was described as largely pleasant. Most similar were the United States/Canada; least similar were South Korea/Denmark. Japan had the most homogenous situational experience; South Korea, the least. The 15 RSQ items varying the most across countries described relatively negative aspects of situational experience; the 15 least varying items were more positive. Further analyses correlated RSQ items with national scores on six value dimensions, the Big Five traits, economic output, and population. Individualism, Neuroticism, Openness, and Gross Domestic Product yielded more significant correlations than expected by chance. Psychological research traditionally has paid more attention to the assessment of persons than of situations, a discrepancy that extends to cross-cultural psychology. The present study demonstrates how cultures vary in situational experience in psychologically meaningful ways.

AB - The purpose of this research is to quantitatively compare everyday situational experience around the world. Local collaborators recruited 5,447 members of college communities in 20 countries, who provided data via a Web site in 14 languages. Using the 89 items of the Riverside Situational Q-sort (RSQ), participants described the situation they experienced the previous evening at 7:00 p.m. Correlations among the average situational profiles of each country ranged from r = .73 to r=.95; the typical situation was described as largely pleasant. Most similar were the United States/Canada; least similar were South Korea/Denmark. Japan had the most homogenous situational experience; South Korea, the least. The 15 RSQ items varying the most across countries described relatively negative aspects of situational experience; the 15 least varying items were more positive. Further analyses correlated RSQ items with national scores on six value dimensions, the Big Five traits, economic output, and population. Individualism, Neuroticism, Openness, and Gross Domestic Product yielded more significant correlations than expected by chance. Psychological research traditionally has paid more attention to the assessment of persons than of situations, a discrepancy that extends to cross-cultural psychology. The present study demonstrates how cultures vary in situational experience in psychologically meaningful ways.

KW - NATIONAL CHARACTER

KW - UNITED-STATES

KW - PERSONALITY

KW - CULTURES

KW - PSYCHOLOGY

KW - BEHAVIOR

KW - EXPRESSION

KW - UNIVERSAL

KW - PEOPLE

KW - JAPAN

U2 - 10.1111/jopy.12176

DO - 10.1111/jopy.12176

M3 - Article

VL - 84

SP - 493

EP - 509

JO - Journal of Personality

JF - Journal of Personality

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Guillaume E, Baranski E, Todd E, Bastian B, Bronin I, Ivanova C et al. The world at 7:00: Comparing the experience of situations across 20 countries. Journal of Personality. 2016;84(4):493-509. https://doi.org/10.1111/jopy.12176