Using brain potentials to functionally localise stroop-like effects in colour and picture naming

Perceptual encoding versus word planning

Natalia Shitova*, Ardi Roelofs, Herbert Schriefers, M.C.M. Bastiaansen, Jan-Mathijs Schoffelen

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleScientificpeer-review

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Abstract

The colour-word Stroop task and the picture-word interference task (PWI) have been used extensively to study the functional processes underlying spoken word production. One of the consistent behavioural effects in both tasks is the Stroop-like effect: The reaction time (RT) is longer on incongruent trials than on congruent trials. The effect in the Stroop task is usually linked to word planning, whereas the effect in the PWI task is associated with either word planning or perceptual encoding. To adjudicate between the word planning and perceptual encoding accounts of the effect in PWI, we conducted an EEG experiment consisting of three tasks: a standard colour-word Stroop task (three colours), a standard PWI task (39 pictures), and a Stroop-like version of the PWI task (three pictures). Participants overtly named the colours and pictures while their EEG was recorded. A Stroop-like effect in RTs was observed in all three tasks. ERPs at centro-parietal sensors started to deflect negatively for incongruent relative to congruent stimuli around 350 ms after stimulus onset for the Stroop, Stroop-like PWI, and the Standard PWI tasks: an N400 effect. No early differences were found in the PWI tasks. The onset of the Stroop-like effect at about 350 ms in all three tasks links the effect to word planning rather than perceptual encoding, which has been estimated in the literature to be finished around 200-250 ms after stimulus onset. We conclude that the Stroop-like effect arises during word planning in both Stroop and PWI.

Original languageEnglish
Article numbere0161052
Number of pages16
JournalPLoS ONE
Volume11
Issue number9
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2016

Keywords

  • TIME-COURSE ANALYSIS
  • SEMANTIC INTERFERENCE
  • COGNITIVE CONTROL
  • LEXICAL ACCESS
  • RESPONSE EXCLUSION
  • TASK PERFORMANCE
  • TEMPORAL COURSE
  • LANGUAGE
  • ERP
  • BOTTLENECK

Cite this

Shitova, Natalia ; Roelofs, Ardi ; Schriefers, Herbert ; Bastiaansen, M.C.M. ; Schoffelen, Jan-Mathijs. / Using brain potentials to functionally localise stroop-like effects in colour and picture naming : Perceptual encoding versus word planning. In: PLoS ONE. 2016 ; Vol. 11, No. 9.
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title = "Using brain potentials to functionally localise stroop-like effects in colour and picture naming: Perceptual encoding versus word planning",
abstract = "The colour-word Stroop task and the picture-word interference task (PWI) have been used extensively to study the functional processes underlying spoken word production. One of the consistent behavioural effects in both tasks is the Stroop-like effect: The reaction time (RT) is longer on incongruent trials than on congruent trials. The effect in the Stroop task is usually linked to word planning, whereas the effect in the PWI task is associated with either word planning or perceptual encoding. To adjudicate between the word planning and perceptual encoding accounts of the effect in PWI, we conducted an EEG experiment consisting of three tasks: a standard colour-word Stroop task (three colours), a standard PWI task (39 pictures), and a Stroop-like version of the PWI task (three pictures). Participants overtly named the colours and pictures while their EEG was recorded. A Stroop-like effect in RTs was observed in all three tasks. ERPs at centro-parietal sensors started to deflect negatively for incongruent relative to congruent stimuli around 350 ms after stimulus onset for the Stroop, Stroop-like PWI, and the Standard PWI tasks: an N400 effect. No early differences were found in the PWI tasks. The onset of the Stroop-like effect at about 350 ms in all three tasks links the effect to word planning rather than perceptual encoding, which has been estimated in the literature to be finished around 200-250 ms after stimulus onset. We conclude that the Stroop-like effect arises during word planning in both Stroop and PWI.",
keywords = "TIME-COURSE ANALYSIS, SEMANTIC INTERFERENCE, COGNITIVE CONTROL, LEXICAL ACCESS, RESPONSE EXCLUSION, TASK PERFORMANCE, TEMPORAL COURSE, LANGUAGE, ERP, BOTTLENECK",
author = "Natalia Shitova and Ardi Roelofs and Herbert Schriefers and M.C.M. Bastiaansen and Jan-Mathijs Schoffelen",
year = "2016",
doi = "10.1371/journal.pone.0161052",
language = "English",
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issn = "1932-6203",
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Using brain potentials to functionally localise stroop-like effects in colour and picture naming : Perceptual encoding versus word planning. / Shitova, Natalia; Roelofs, Ardi; Schriefers, Herbert; Bastiaansen, M.C.M.; Schoffelen, Jan-Mathijs.

In: PLoS ONE, Vol. 11, No. 9, e0161052, 2016.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleScientificpeer-review

TY - JOUR

T1 - Using brain potentials to functionally localise stroop-like effects in colour and picture naming

T2 - Perceptual encoding versus word planning

AU - Shitova, Natalia

AU - Roelofs, Ardi

AU - Schriefers, Herbert

AU - Bastiaansen, M.C.M.

AU - Schoffelen, Jan-Mathijs

PY - 2016

Y1 - 2016

N2 - The colour-word Stroop task and the picture-word interference task (PWI) have been used extensively to study the functional processes underlying spoken word production. One of the consistent behavioural effects in both tasks is the Stroop-like effect: The reaction time (RT) is longer on incongruent trials than on congruent trials. The effect in the Stroop task is usually linked to word planning, whereas the effect in the PWI task is associated with either word planning or perceptual encoding. To adjudicate between the word planning and perceptual encoding accounts of the effect in PWI, we conducted an EEG experiment consisting of three tasks: a standard colour-word Stroop task (three colours), a standard PWI task (39 pictures), and a Stroop-like version of the PWI task (three pictures). Participants overtly named the colours and pictures while their EEG was recorded. A Stroop-like effect in RTs was observed in all three tasks. ERPs at centro-parietal sensors started to deflect negatively for incongruent relative to congruent stimuli around 350 ms after stimulus onset for the Stroop, Stroop-like PWI, and the Standard PWI tasks: an N400 effect. No early differences were found in the PWI tasks. The onset of the Stroop-like effect at about 350 ms in all three tasks links the effect to word planning rather than perceptual encoding, which has been estimated in the literature to be finished around 200-250 ms after stimulus onset. We conclude that the Stroop-like effect arises during word planning in both Stroop and PWI.

AB - The colour-word Stroop task and the picture-word interference task (PWI) have been used extensively to study the functional processes underlying spoken word production. One of the consistent behavioural effects in both tasks is the Stroop-like effect: The reaction time (RT) is longer on incongruent trials than on congruent trials. The effect in the Stroop task is usually linked to word planning, whereas the effect in the PWI task is associated with either word planning or perceptual encoding. To adjudicate between the word planning and perceptual encoding accounts of the effect in PWI, we conducted an EEG experiment consisting of three tasks: a standard colour-word Stroop task (three colours), a standard PWI task (39 pictures), and a Stroop-like version of the PWI task (three pictures). Participants overtly named the colours and pictures while their EEG was recorded. A Stroop-like effect in RTs was observed in all three tasks. ERPs at centro-parietal sensors started to deflect negatively for incongruent relative to congruent stimuli around 350 ms after stimulus onset for the Stroop, Stroop-like PWI, and the Standard PWI tasks: an N400 effect. No early differences were found in the PWI tasks. The onset of the Stroop-like effect at about 350 ms in all three tasks links the effect to word planning rather than perceptual encoding, which has been estimated in the literature to be finished around 200-250 ms after stimulus onset. We conclude that the Stroop-like effect arises during word planning in both Stroop and PWI.

KW - TIME-COURSE ANALYSIS

KW - SEMANTIC INTERFERENCE

KW - COGNITIVE CONTROL

KW - LEXICAL ACCESS

KW - RESPONSE EXCLUSION

KW - TASK PERFORMANCE

KW - TEMPORAL COURSE

KW - LANGUAGE

KW - ERP

KW - BOTTLENECK

U2 - 10.1371/journal.pone.0161052

DO - 10.1371/journal.pone.0161052

M3 - Article

VL - 11

JO - PLoS ONE

JF - PLoS ONE

SN - 1932-6203

IS - 9

M1 - e0161052

ER -