Using codesign to develop a culturally tailored, behavior change mHealth intervention for indigenous and other priority communities

A case study in New Zealand

M. E. A. Verbiest*, C. Corrigan, S. Dalhousie, R. Firestone, T. Funaki, D. Goodwin, J. Grey, A. Henry, G. Humphrey, A. Jull, M. Vano, C. Pekepo, L. Te Morenga, R. Whittaker, C. N. Mhurchu

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleScientificpeer-review

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Abstract

The obesity rate in New Zealand is one of the highest worldwide (31%), with highest rates among Māori (47%) and Pasifika (67%). Codesign was used to develop a culturally tailored, behavior change mHealth intervention for Māori and Pasifika in New Zealand. The purpose of this article is to provide an overview of the codesign methods and processes and describe how these were used to inform and build a theory-driven approach to the selection of behavioral determinants and change techniques. The codesign approach in this study was based on a partnership between Māori and Pasifika partners and an academic research team. This involved working with communities on opportunity identification, elucidation of needs and desires, knowledge generation, envisaging the mHealth tool, and prototype testing. Models of Māori and Pasifika holistic well-being and health promotion were the basis for identifying key content modules and were applied to relevant determinants of behavior change and theoretically based behavior change techniques from the Theoretical Domains Framework and Behavior Change Taxonomy, respectively. Three key content modules were identified: physical activity, family/whānau [extended family], and healthy eating. Other important themes included mental well-being/stress, connecting, motivation/support, and health literacy. Relevant behavioral determinants were selected, and 17 change techniques were mapped to these determinants. Community partners established that a smartphone app was the optimal vehicle for the intervention. Both Māori and Pasifika versions of the app were developed to ensure features and functionalities were culturally tailored and appealing to users. Codesign enabled and empowered users to tailor the intervention to their cultural needs. By using codesign and applying both ethnic-specific and Western theoretical frameworks of health and behavior change, the mHealth intervention is both evidence based and culturally tailored.
Original languageEnglish
Number of pages17
JournalTranslational Behavioral Medicine
DOIs
Publication statusE-pub ahead of print - 2019

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New Zealand
Health Behavior

Cite this

Verbiest, M. E. A. ; Corrigan, C. ; Dalhousie, S. ; Firestone, R. ; Funaki, T. ; Goodwin, D. ; Grey, J. ; Henry, A. ; Humphrey, G. ; Jull, A. ; Vano, M. ; Pekepo, C. ; Te Morenga, L. ; Whittaker, R. ; Mhurchu, C. N. / Using codesign to develop a culturally tailored, behavior change mHealth intervention for indigenous and other priority communities : A case study in New Zealand. In: Translational Behavioral Medicine. 2019.
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title = "Using codesign to develop a culturally tailored, behavior change mHealth intervention for indigenous and other priority communities: A case study in New Zealand",
abstract = "The obesity rate in New Zealand is one of the highest worldwide (31{\%}), with highest rates among Māori (47{\%}) and Pasifika (67{\%}). Codesign was used to develop a culturally tailored, behavior change mHealth intervention for Māori and Pasifika in New Zealand. The purpose of this article is to provide an overview of the codesign methods and processes and describe how these were used to inform and build a theory-driven approach to the selection of behavioral determinants and change techniques. The codesign approach in this study was based on a partnership between Māori and Pasifika partners and an academic research team. This involved working with communities on opportunity identification, elucidation of needs and desires, knowledge generation, envisaging the mHealth tool, and prototype testing. Models of Māori and Pasifika holistic well-being and health promotion were the basis for identifying key content modules and were applied to relevant determinants of behavior change and theoretically based behavior change techniques from the Theoretical Domains Framework and Behavior Change Taxonomy, respectively. Three key content modules were identified: physical activity, family/whānau [extended family], and healthy eating. Other important themes included mental well-being/stress, connecting, motivation/support, and health literacy. Relevant behavioral determinants were selected, and 17 change techniques were mapped to these determinants. Community partners established that a smartphone app was the optimal vehicle for the intervention. Both Māori and Pasifika versions of the app were developed to ensure features and functionalities were culturally tailored and appealing to users. Codesign enabled and empowered users to tailor the intervention to their cultural needs. By using codesign and applying both ethnic-specific and Western theoretical frameworks of health and behavior change, the mHealth intervention is both evidence based and culturally tailored.",
author = "Verbiest, {M. E. A.} and C. Corrigan and S. Dalhousie and R. Firestone and T. Funaki and D. Goodwin and J. Grey and A. Henry and G. Humphrey and A. Jull and M. Vano and C. Pekepo and {Te Morenga}, L. and R. Whittaker and Mhurchu, {C. N.}",
year = "2019",
doi = "10.1093/tbm/iby093",
language = "English",
journal = "Translational Behavioral Medicine",
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Verbiest, MEA, Corrigan, C, Dalhousie, S, Firestone, R, Funaki, T, Goodwin, D, Grey, J, Henry, A, Humphrey, G, Jull, A, Vano, M, Pekepo, C, Te Morenga, L, Whittaker, R & Mhurchu, CN 2019, 'Using codesign to develop a culturally tailored, behavior change mHealth intervention for indigenous and other priority communities: A case study in New Zealand', Translational Behavioral Medicine. https://doi.org/10.1093/tbm/iby093

Using codesign to develop a culturally tailored, behavior change mHealth intervention for indigenous and other priority communities : A case study in New Zealand. / Verbiest, M. E. A.; Corrigan, C.; Dalhousie, S.; Firestone, R.; Funaki, T.; Goodwin, D.; Grey, J.; Henry, A.; Humphrey, G.; Jull, A.; Vano, M.; Pekepo, C.; Te Morenga, L.; Whittaker, R.; Mhurchu, C. N.

In: Translational Behavioral Medicine, 2019.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleScientificpeer-review

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T1 - Using codesign to develop a culturally tailored, behavior change mHealth intervention for indigenous and other priority communities

T2 - A case study in New Zealand

AU - Verbiest, M. E. A.

AU - Corrigan, C.

AU - Dalhousie, S.

AU - Firestone, R.

AU - Funaki, T.

AU - Goodwin, D.

AU - Grey, J.

AU - Henry, A.

AU - Humphrey, G.

AU - Jull, A.

AU - Vano, M.

AU - Pekepo, C.

AU - Te Morenga, L.

AU - Whittaker, R.

AU - Mhurchu, C. N.

PY - 2019

Y1 - 2019

N2 - The obesity rate in New Zealand is one of the highest worldwide (31%), with highest rates among Māori (47%) and Pasifika (67%). Codesign was used to develop a culturally tailored, behavior change mHealth intervention for Māori and Pasifika in New Zealand. The purpose of this article is to provide an overview of the codesign methods and processes and describe how these were used to inform and build a theory-driven approach to the selection of behavioral determinants and change techniques. The codesign approach in this study was based on a partnership between Māori and Pasifika partners and an academic research team. This involved working with communities on opportunity identification, elucidation of needs and desires, knowledge generation, envisaging the mHealth tool, and prototype testing. Models of Māori and Pasifika holistic well-being and health promotion were the basis for identifying key content modules and were applied to relevant determinants of behavior change and theoretically based behavior change techniques from the Theoretical Domains Framework and Behavior Change Taxonomy, respectively. Three key content modules were identified: physical activity, family/whānau [extended family], and healthy eating. Other important themes included mental well-being/stress, connecting, motivation/support, and health literacy. Relevant behavioral determinants were selected, and 17 change techniques were mapped to these determinants. Community partners established that a smartphone app was the optimal vehicle for the intervention. Both Māori and Pasifika versions of the app were developed to ensure features and functionalities were culturally tailored and appealing to users. Codesign enabled and empowered users to tailor the intervention to their cultural needs. By using codesign and applying both ethnic-specific and Western theoretical frameworks of health and behavior change, the mHealth intervention is both evidence based and culturally tailored.

AB - The obesity rate in New Zealand is one of the highest worldwide (31%), with highest rates among Māori (47%) and Pasifika (67%). Codesign was used to develop a culturally tailored, behavior change mHealth intervention for Māori and Pasifika in New Zealand. The purpose of this article is to provide an overview of the codesign methods and processes and describe how these were used to inform and build a theory-driven approach to the selection of behavioral determinants and change techniques. The codesign approach in this study was based on a partnership between Māori and Pasifika partners and an academic research team. This involved working with communities on opportunity identification, elucidation of needs and desires, knowledge generation, envisaging the mHealth tool, and prototype testing. Models of Māori and Pasifika holistic well-being and health promotion were the basis for identifying key content modules and were applied to relevant determinants of behavior change and theoretically based behavior change techniques from the Theoretical Domains Framework and Behavior Change Taxonomy, respectively. Three key content modules were identified: physical activity, family/whānau [extended family], and healthy eating. Other important themes included mental well-being/stress, connecting, motivation/support, and health literacy. Relevant behavioral determinants were selected, and 17 change techniques were mapped to these determinants. Community partners established that a smartphone app was the optimal vehicle for the intervention. Both Māori and Pasifika versions of the app were developed to ensure features and functionalities were culturally tailored and appealing to users. Codesign enabled and empowered users to tailor the intervention to their cultural needs. By using codesign and applying both ethnic-specific and Western theoretical frameworks of health and behavior change, the mHealth intervention is both evidence based and culturally tailored.

U2 - 10.1093/tbm/iby093

DO - 10.1093/tbm/iby093

M3 - Article

JO - Translational Behavioral Medicine

JF - Translational Behavioral Medicine

SN - 1869-6716

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