Utility scores for different health states related to depression: Individual participant data analysis

S. Kolovos, J.E. Bosmans, J.M. Van Dongen, B. Van Esveld, D. Magai, A. Van Straten, C.M. van der Feltz-Cornelis, K.M. Van Steenbergen-weijenburg, K.M. Huijbregts, H. Van Marwijk, H. Riper, M.W. Van Tulder

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Abstract

Objectives
Depression is associated with considerable impairments in health-related quality-of-life. However, the relationship between different health states related to depression severity and utility scores is unclear. The aim of this study was to evaluate whether utility scores are different for various health states related to depression severity.
Methods
We gathered individual participant data from ten randomized controlled trials evaluating depression treatments. The UK EQ-5D and SF-6D tariffs were used to generate utility scores. We defined five health states that were proposed from American Psychiatric Association and National Institute for Clinical Excellence guidelines: remission, minor depression, mild depression, moderate depression, and severe depression. We performed multilevel linear regression analysis.
Results
We included 1629 participants in the analyses. The average EQ-5D utility scores for the five health states were 0.70 (95% CI 0.67–0.73) for remission, 0.62 (95% CI 0.58–0.65) for minor depression, 0.57 (95% CI 0.54–0.61) for mild depression, 0.52 (95%CI 0.49–0.56) for moderate depression, and 0.39 (95% CI 0.35–0.43) for severe depression. In comparison with the EQ-5D, the utility scores based on the SF-6D were similar for remission (EQ-5D = 0.70 vs. SF-6D = 0.69), but higher for severe depression (EQ-5D = 0.39 vs. SF-6D = 0.55).
Conclusions
We observed statistically significant differences in utility scores between depression health states. Individuals with less severe depressive symptoms had on average statistically significant higher utility scores than individuals suffering from more severe depressive symptomatology. In the present study, EQ-5D had a larger range of values as compared to SF-6D.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1649–1658
JournalQuality of Life Research
Volume26
Issue number7
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2017

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Depression
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Kolovos, S., Bosmans, J. E., Van Dongen, J. M., Van Esveld, B., Magai, D., Van Straten, A., ... Van Tulder, M. W. (2017). Utility scores for different health states related to depression: Individual participant data analysis. Quality of Life Research, 26(7), 1649–1658. https://doi.org/10.1007/s11136-017-1536-2
Kolovos, S. ; Bosmans, J.E. ; Van Dongen, J.M. ; Van Esveld, B. ; Magai, D. ; Van Straten, A. ; van der Feltz-Cornelis, C.M. ; Van Steenbergen-weijenburg, K.M. ; Huijbregts, K.M. ; Van Marwijk, H. ; Riper, H. ; Van Tulder, M.W. / Utility scores for different health states related to depression : Individual participant data analysis. In: Quality of Life Research. 2017 ; Vol. 26, No. 7. pp. 1649–1658.
@article{70715f0bfa2b4a6b83d3167bb0084436,
title = "Utility scores for different health states related to depression: Individual participant data analysis",
abstract = "ObjectivesDepression is associated with considerable impairments in health-related quality-of-life. However, the relationship between different health states related to depression severity and utility scores is unclear. The aim of this study was to evaluate whether utility scores are different for various health states related to depression severity.MethodsWe gathered individual participant data from ten randomized controlled trials evaluating depression treatments. The UK EQ-5D and SF-6D tariffs were used to generate utility scores. We defined five health states that were proposed from American Psychiatric Association and National Institute for Clinical Excellence guidelines: remission, minor depression, mild depression, moderate depression, and severe depression. We performed multilevel linear regression analysis.ResultsWe included 1629 participants in the analyses. The average EQ-5D utility scores for the five health states were 0.70 (95{\%} CI 0.67–0.73) for remission, 0.62 (95{\%} CI 0.58–0.65) for minor depression, 0.57 (95{\%} CI 0.54–0.61) for mild depression, 0.52 (95{\%}CI 0.49–0.56) for moderate depression, and 0.39 (95{\%} CI 0.35–0.43) for severe depression. In comparison with the EQ-5D, the utility scores based on the SF-6D were similar for remission (EQ-5D = 0.70 vs. SF-6D = 0.69), but higher for severe depression (EQ-5D = 0.39 vs. SF-6D = 0.55).ConclusionsWe observed statistically significant differences in utility scores between depression health states. Individuals with less severe depressive symptoms had on average statistically significant higher utility scores than individuals suffering from more severe depressive symptomatology. In the present study, EQ-5D had a larger range of values as compared to SF-6D.",
author = "S. Kolovos and J.E. Bosmans and {Van Dongen}, J.M. and {Van Esveld}, B. and D. Magai and {Van Straten}, A. and {van der Feltz-Cornelis}, C.M. and {Van Steenbergen-weijenburg}, K.M. and K.M. Huijbregts and {Van Marwijk}, H. and H. Riper and {Van Tulder}, M.W.",
year = "2017",
doi = "10.1007/s11136-017-1536-2",
language = "English",
volume = "26",
pages = "1649–1658",
journal = "Quality of Life Research",
issn = "0962-9343",
publisher = "Springer",
number = "7",

}

Kolovos, S, Bosmans, JE, Van Dongen, JM, Van Esveld, B, Magai, D, Van Straten, A, van der Feltz-Cornelis, CM, Van Steenbergen-weijenburg, KM, Huijbregts, KM, Van Marwijk, H, Riper, H & Van Tulder, MW 2017, 'Utility scores for different health states related to depression: Individual participant data analysis' Quality of Life Research, vol. 26, no. 7, pp. 1649–1658. https://doi.org/10.1007/s11136-017-1536-2

Utility scores for different health states related to depression : Individual participant data analysis. / Kolovos, S.; Bosmans, J.E.; Van Dongen, J.M.; Van Esveld, B.; Magai, D.; Van Straten, A.; van der Feltz-Cornelis, C.M.; Van Steenbergen-weijenburg, K.M.; Huijbregts, K.M.; Van Marwijk, H.; Riper, H.; Van Tulder, M.W.

In: Quality of Life Research, Vol. 26, No. 7, 2017, p. 1649–1658.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleScientificpeer-review

TY - JOUR

T1 - Utility scores for different health states related to depression

T2 - Individual participant data analysis

AU - Kolovos, S.

AU - Bosmans, J.E.

AU - Van Dongen, J.M.

AU - Van Esveld, B.

AU - Magai, D.

AU - Van Straten, A.

AU - van der Feltz-Cornelis, C.M.

AU - Van Steenbergen-weijenburg, K.M.

AU - Huijbregts, K.M.

AU - Van Marwijk, H.

AU - Riper, H.

AU - Van Tulder, M.W.

PY - 2017

Y1 - 2017

N2 - ObjectivesDepression is associated with considerable impairments in health-related quality-of-life. However, the relationship between different health states related to depression severity and utility scores is unclear. The aim of this study was to evaluate whether utility scores are different for various health states related to depression severity.MethodsWe gathered individual participant data from ten randomized controlled trials evaluating depression treatments. The UK EQ-5D and SF-6D tariffs were used to generate utility scores. We defined five health states that were proposed from American Psychiatric Association and National Institute for Clinical Excellence guidelines: remission, minor depression, mild depression, moderate depression, and severe depression. We performed multilevel linear regression analysis.ResultsWe included 1629 participants in the analyses. The average EQ-5D utility scores for the five health states were 0.70 (95% CI 0.67–0.73) for remission, 0.62 (95% CI 0.58–0.65) for minor depression, 0.57 (95% CI 0.54–0.61) for mild depression, 0.52 (95%CI 0.49–0.56) for moderate depression, and 0.39 (95% CI 0.35–0.43) for severe depression. In comparison with the EQ-5D, the utility scores based on the SF-6D were similar for remission (EQ-5D = 0.70 vs. SF-6D = 0.69), but higher for severe depression (EQ-5D = 0.39 vs. SF-6D = 0.55).ConclusionsWe observed statistically significant differences in utility scores between depression health states. Individuals with less severe depressive symptoms had on average statistically significant higher utility scores than individuals suffering from more severe depressive symptomatology. In the present study, EQ-5D had a larger range of values as compared to SF-6D.

AB - ObjectivesDepression is associated with considerable impairments in health-related quality-of-life. However, the relationship between different health states related to depression severity and utility scores is unclear. The aim of this study was to evaluate whether utility scores are different for various health states related to depression severity.MethodsWe gathered individual participant data from ten randomized controlled trials evaluating depression treatments. The UK EQ-5D and SF-6D tariffs were used to generate utility scores. We defined five health states that were proposed from American Psychiatric Association and National Institute for Clinical Excellence guidelines: remission, minor depression, mild depression, moderate depression, and severe depression. We performed multilevel linear regression analysis.ResultsWe included 1629 participants in the analyses. The average EQ-5D utility scores for the five health states were 0.70 (95% CI 0.67–0.73) for remission, 0.62 (95% CI 0.58–0.65) for minor depression, 0.57 (95% CI 0.54–0.61) for mild depression, 0.52 (95%CI 0.49–0.56) for moderate depression, and 0.39 (95% CI 0.35–0.43) for severe depression. In comparison with the EQ-5D, the utility scores based on the SF-6D were similar for remission (EQ-5D = 0.70 vs. SF-6D = 0.69), but higher for severe depression (EQ-5D = 0.39 vs. SF-6D = 0.55).ConclusionsWe observed statistically significant differences in utility scores between depression health states. Individuals with less severe depressive symptoms had on average statistically significant higher utility scores than individuals suffering from more severe depressive symptomatology. In the present study, EQ-5D had a larger range of values as compared to SF-6D.

U2 - 10.1007/s11136-017-1536-2

DO - 10.1007/s11136-017-1536-2

M3 - Article

VL - 26

SP - 1649

EP - 1658

JO - Quality of Life Research

JF - Quality of Life Research

SN - 0962-9343

IS - 7

ER -