Video gaming in a hyperconnected world

A cross-sectional study of heavy gaming, problematic gaming symptoms, and online socializing in adolescents

Michelle Colder Carras, Antonius J Van Rooij, D. Van de Mheen, R. Musci, Qian-Li Xue, T. Mendelson

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleScientificpeer-review

Abstract

Aims: 

Examining online social interactions along with patterns of video gaming behaviors and game addiction symptoms has the potential to enrich our understanding of disorders related to excessive video game play.

Methods: 

We performed latent class analysis in a sample of 9733 adolescents based on heavy use of games, social networking and instant messaging, and game addiction symptoms. We used latent class regression to determine associations between classes, psychosocial well-being and friendship quality.

Results: 

We identified two types of heavy gaming classes that differed in probability of online social interaction. Classes with more online social interaction reported fewer problematic gaming symptoms than those with less online social interaction. Most adolescents estimated to be in heavy gaming classes had more depressive symptoms than normative classes. Male non-social gamers had more social anxiety. Female social gamers had less social anxiety and loneliness, but lower self-esteem. Friendship quality attenuated depression in some male social gamers, but strengthened associations with loneliness in some male non-social gamers.

Conclusions: 

In adolescents, symptoms of video game addiction depend not only on video game play but also on concurrent levels of online communication, and those who are very socially active online report fewer symptoms of game addiction.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)472-479
JournalComputers in Human Behavior
Volume68
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2017

Fingerprint

Video Games
Cross-Sectional Studies
Loneliness
Communication
Depression
Gaming
Social Interaction
Addiction

Keywords

  • Journal Article

Cite this

@article{1eb731213b494f8184dd2e198a04a993,
title = "Video gaming in a hyperconnected world: A cross-sectional study of heavy gaming, problematic gaming symptoms, and online socializing in adolescents",
abstract = "Aims: Examining online social interactions along with patterns of video gaming behaviors and game addiction symptoms has the potential to enrich our understanding of disorders related to excessive video game play.Methods: We performed latent class analysis in a sample of 9733 adolescents based on heavy use of games, social networking and instant messaging, and game addiction symptoms. We used latent class regression to determine associations between classes, psychosocial well-being and friendship quality.Results: We identified two types of heavy gaming classes that differed in probability of online social interaction. Classes with more online social interaction reported fewer problematic gaming symptoms than those with less online social interaction. Most adolescents estimated to be in heavy gaming classes had more depressive symptoms than normative classes. Male non-social gamers had more social anxiety. Female social gamers had less social anxiety and loneliness, but lower self-esteem. Friendship quality attenuated depression in some male social gamers, but strengthened associations with loneliness in some male non-social gamers.Conclusions: In adolescents, symptoms of video game addiction depend not only on video game play but also on concurrent levels of online communication, and those who are very socially active online report fewer symptoms of game addiction.",
keywords = "Journal Article",
author = "Carras, {Michelle Colder} and {Van Rooij}, {Antonius J} and {Van de Mheen}, D. and R. Musci and Qian-Li Xue and T. Mendelson",
year = "2017",
doi = "10.1016/j.chb.2016.11.060",
language = "English",
volume = "68",
pages = "472--479",
journal = "Computers in Human Behavior",
issn = "0747-5632",
publisher = "PERGAMON-ELSEVIER SCIENCE LTD",

}

Video gaming in a hyperconnected world : A cross-sectional study of heavy gaming, problematic gaming symptoms, and online socializing in adolescents. / Carras, Michelle Colder; Van Rooij, Antonius J; Van de Mheen, D.; Musci, R.; Xue, Qian-Li; Mendelson, T.

In: Computers in Human Behavior, Vol. 68, 2017, p. 472-479.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleScientificpeer-review

TY - JOUR

T1 - Video gaming in a hyperconnected world

T2 - A cross-sectional study of heavy gaming, problematic gaming symptoms, and online socializing in adolescents

AU - Carras, Michelle Colder

AU - Van Rooij, Antonius J

AU - Van de Mheen, D.

AU - Musci, R.

AU - Xue, Qian-Li

AU - Mendelson, T.

PY - 2017

Y1 - 2017

N2 - Aims: Examining online social interactions along with patterns of video gaming behaviors and game addiction symptoms has the potential to enrich our understanding of disorders related to excessive video game play.Methods: We performed latent class analysis in a sample of 9733 adolescents based on heavy use of games, social networking and instant messaging, and game addiction symptoms. We used latent class regression to determine associations between classes, psychosocial well-being and friendship quality.Results: We identified two types of heavy gaming classes that differed in probability of online social interaction. Classes with more online social interaction reported fewer problematic gaming symptoms than those with less online social interaction. Most adolescents estimated to be in heavy gaming classes had more depressive symptoms than normative classes. Male non-social gamers had more social anxiety. Female social gamers had less social anxiety and loneliness, but lower self-esteem. Friendship quality attenuated depression in some male social gamers, but strengthened associations with loneliness in some male non-social gamers.Conclusions: In adolescents, symptoms of video game addiction depend not only on video game play but also on concurrent levels of online communication, and those who are very socially active online report fewer symptoms of game addiction.

AB - Aims: Examining online social interactions along with patterns of video gaming behaviors and game addiction symptoms has the potential to enrich our understanding of disorders related to excessive video game play.Methods: We performed latent class analysis in a sample of 9733 adolescents based on heavy use of games, social networking and instant messaging, and game addiction symptoms. We used latent class regression to determine associations between classes, psychosocial well-being and friendship quality.Results: We identified two types of heavy gaming classes that differed in probability of online social interaction. Classes with more online social interaction reported fewer problematic gaming symptoms than those with less online social interaction. Most adolescents estimated to be in heavy gaming classes had more depressive symptoms than normative classes. Male non-social gamers had more social anxiety. Female social gamers had less social anxiety and loneliness, but lower self-esteem. Friendship quality attenuated depression in some male social gamers, but strengthened associations with loneliness in some male non-social gamers.Conclusions: In adolescents, symptoms of video game addiction depend not only on video game play but also on concurrent levels of online communication, and those who are very socially active online report fewer symptoms of game addiction.

KW - Journal Article

U2 - 10.1016/j.chb.2016.11.060

DO - 10.1016/j.chb.2016.11.060

M3 - Article

VL - 68

SP - 472

EP - 479

JO - Computers in Human Behavior

JF - Computers in Human Behavior

SN - 0747-5632

ER -