What parents can do to keep their children from smoking: A systematic review on smoking-specific parenting strategies and smoking onset

J.M. Hiemstra, R.N.H. de Leeuw, R.C.M.E. Engels, R. Otten

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleScientificpeer-review

Abstract

Aim
To provide a systematic overview of longitudinal studies on different smoking-specific parenting practices (i.e., perceived parental norms and influences, smoking-specific monitoring, availability of cigarettes at home, household smoking rules, non-smoking agreements, smoking-specific communication, and parental reactions) as useful tools in the prevention of youth smoking.
Method
MEDLINE and PsychINFO search identified 986 studies published from 1990 to December 2016. Two independent researchers identified eligible studies. Study quality was assessed using Newcastle Ottawa Scale (NOS).
Results
The systematic search resulted in 1 to 14 longitudinal studies per parenting practice. Studies scored between 4 and 9 on the NOS, indicating an overall moderate quality. The results of complete smoking house rules showed a preventive effect on smoking onset. Furthermore, availability of cigarettes, frequency and quality of communication, parental reaction (i.e., conflict engagement) and norms showed significant and non-significant effects. Significant results were in line with expectations: availability of cigarettes and frequent communication about smoking predicted smoking, whereas a high quality of communication, negative reactions or punishments and setting norms by parents showed a preventive effect. No effects were found for non-smoking agreements. The number of studies was too limited to draw conclusions about other parenting strategies. More research on (1) reliable and valid instruments, (2) other stages of smoking in addition to onset, and (3) potential moderators and mediators is warranted.
Conclusion
While evidence supports the effectiveness of smoking-specific parenting, further research is required.
Keywords
Smoking
Anti-smoking socialization
Smoking-specific parenting
Adolescence
Systematic review
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)107-128
JournalAddictive Behaviors
Volume70
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2017

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Parenting
Parents
Tobacco Products
Communication
Availability
Moderators
Monitoring

Cite this

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title = "What parents can do to keep their children from smoking: A systematic review on smoking-specific parenting strategies and smoking onset",
abstract = "AimTo provide a systematic overview of longitudinal studies on different smoking-specific parenting practices (i.e., perceived parental norms and influences, smoking-specific monitoring, availability of cigarettes at home, household smoking rules, non-smoking agreements, smoking-specific communication, and parental reactions) as useful tools in the prevention of youth smoking.MethodMEDLINE and PsychINFO search identified 986 studies published from 1990 to December 2016. Two independent researchers identified eligible studies. Study quality was assessed using Newcastle Ottawa Scale (NOS).ResultsThe systematic search resulted in 1 to 14 longitudinal studies per parenting practice. Studies scored between 4 and 9 on the NOS, indicating an overall moderate quality. The results of complete smoking house rules showed a preventive effect on smoking onset. Furthermore, availability of cigarettes, frequency and quality of communication, parental reaction (i.e., conflict engagement) and norms showed significant and non-significant effects. Significant results were in line with expectations: availability of cigarettes and frequent communication about smoking predicted smoking, whereas a high quality of communication, negative reactions or punishments and setting norms by parents showed a preventive effect. No effects were found for non-smoking agreements. The number of studies was too limited to draw conclusions about other parenting strategies. More research on (1) reliable and valid instruments, (2) other stages of smoking in addition to onset, and (3) potential moderators and mediators is warranted.ConclusionWhile evidence supports the effectiveness of smoking-specific parenting, further research is required.KeywordsSmokingAnti-smoking socializationSmoking-specific parentingAdolescenceSystematic review",
author = "J.M. Hiemstra and {de Leeuw}, R.N.H. and R.C.M.E. Engels and R. Otten",
year = "2017",
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}

What parents can do to keep their children from smoking : A systematic review on smoking-specific parenting strategies and smoking onset. / Hiemstra, J.M.; de Leeuw, R.N.H.; Engels, R.C.M.E.; Otten, R.

In: Addictive Behaviors, Vol. 70, 2017, p. 107-128.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleScientificpeer-review

TY - JOUR

T1 - What parents can do to keep their children from smoking

T2 - A systematic review on smoking-specific parenting strategies and smoking onset

AU - Hiemstra, J.M.

AU - de Leeuw, R.N.H.

AU - Engels, R.C.M.E.

AU - Otten, R.

PY - 2017

Y1 - 2017

N2 - AimTo provide a systematic overview of longitudinal studies on different smoking-specific parenting practices (i.e., perceived parental norms and influences, smoking-specific monitoring, availability of cigarettes at home, household smoking rules, non-smoking agreements, smoking-specific communication, and parental reactions) as useful tools in the prevention of youth smoking.MethodMEDLINE and PsychINFO search identified 986 studies published from 1990 to December 2016. Two independent researchers identified eligible studies. Study quality was assessed using Newcastle Ottawa Scale (NOS).ResultsThe systematic search resulted in 1 to 14 longitudinal studies per parenting practice. Studies scored between 4 and 9 on the NOS, indicating an overall moderate quality. The results of complete smoking house rules showed a preventive effect on smoking onset. Furthermore, availability of cigarettes, frequency and quality of communication, parental reaction (i.e., conflict engagement) and norms showed significant and non-significant effects. Significant results were in line with expectations: availability of cigarettes and frequent communication about smoking predicted smoking, whereas a high quality of communication, negative reactions or punishments and setting norms by parents showed a preventive effect. No effects were found for non-smoking agreements. The number of studies was too limited to draw conclusions about other parenting strategies. More research on (1) reliable and valid instruments, (2) other stages of smoking in addition to onset, and (3) potential moderators and mediators is warranted.ConclusionWhile evidence supports the effectiveness of smoking-specific parenting, further research is required.KeywordsSmokingAnti-smoking socializationSmoking-specific parentingAdolescenceSystematic review

AB - AimTo provide a systematic overview of longitudinal studies on different smoking-specific parenting practices (i.e., perceived parental norms and influences, smoking-specific monitoring, availability of cigarettes at home, household smoking rules, non-smoking agreements, smoking-specific communication, and parental reactions) as useful tools in the prevention of youth smoking.MethodMEDLINE and PsychINFO search identified 986 studies published from 1990 to December 2016. Two independent researchers identified eligible studies. Study quality was assessed using Newcastle Ottawa Scale (NOS).ResultsThe systematic search resulted in 1 to 14 longitudinal studies per parenting practice. Studies scored between 4 and 9 on the NOS, indicating an overall moderate quality. The results of complete smoking house rules showed a preventive effect on smoking onset. Furthermore, availability of cigarettes, frequency and quality of communication, parental reaction (i.e., conflict engagement) and norms showed significant and non-significant effects. Significant results were in line with expectations: availability of cigarettes and frequent communication about smoking predicted smoking, whereas a high quality of communication, negative reactions or punishments and setting norms by parents showed a preventive effect. No effects were found for non-smoking agreements. The number of studies was too limited to draw conclusions about other parenting strategies. More research on (1) reliable and valid instruments, (2) other stages of smoking in addition to onset, and (3) potential moderators and mediators is warranted.ConclusionWhile evidence supports the effectiveness of smoking-specific parenting, further research is required.KeywordsSmokingAnti-smoking socializationSmoking-specific parentingAdolescenceSystematic review

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