What you see is what you eat: an ALE meta-analysis of the neural correlates of food viewing in children and adolescents

Floor van Meer, Laura N van der Laan, Roger A H Adan, Max A Viergever, Paul A M Smeets

Research output: Contribution to journalReview articleScientificpeer-review

Abstract

Food cues are omnipresent and may enhance overconsumption. In the last two decades the prevalence of childhood obesity has increased dramatically all over the world, largely due to overconsumption. Understanding children's neural responses to food may help to develop better interventions for preventing or reducing overconsumption. We aimed to determine which brain regions are concurrently activated in children/adolescents in response to viewing food pictures, and how these relate to adult findings. Two activation likelihood estimation (ALE) meta-analyses were performed: one with studies in normal weight children/adolescents (aged 8-18, 8 studies, 137 foci) and one with studies in normal weight adults (aged 18-45, 16 studies, 178 foci). A contrast analysis was performed for children/adolescents vs. adults. In children/adolescents, the most concurrent clusters were in the left lateral orbitofrontal cortex (OFC), the bilateral fusiform gyrus, and the right superior parietal lobule. In adults, clusters in similar areas were found. Although the number of studies for a direct statistical comparison between the groups was relatively low, there were indications that children/adolescents may not activate areas important for cognitive control. Overall, the number of studies that contributed to the significant clusters was moderate (6-75%). In summary, the brain areas most consistently activated in children/adolescents by food viewing are part of the appetitive brain network and overlap with those found in adults. However, the age range of the children studied was rather broad. This study offers important recommendations for future research; studies making a direct comparison between adults and children in a sufficiently narrow age range would further elucidate how neural responses to food cues change during development.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)35-43
Number of pages9
JournalNeuroimage
Volume104
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Jan 2015
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Cues
Weights and Measures
Pediatric Obesity

Keywords

  • Adolescent
  • Adult
  • Aging/physiology
  • Brain/anatomy & histology
  • Brain Mapping
  • Child
  • Cues
  • Feeding Behavior/physiology
  • Female
  • Food
  • Humans
  • Male
  • Middle Aged
  • Photic Stimulation
  • Prefrontal Cortex/physiology
  • Young Adult

Cite this

van Meer, Floor ; van der Laan, Laura N ; Adan, Roger A H ; Viergever, Max A ; Smeets, Paul A M. / What you see is what you eat : an ALE meta-analysis of the neural correlates of food viewing in children and adolescents. In: Neuroimage. 2015 ; Vol. 104. pp. 35-43.
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abstract = "Food cues are omnipresent and may enhance overconsumption. In the last two decades the prevalence of childhood obesity has increased dramatically all over the world, largely due to overconsumption. Understanding children's neural responses to food may help to develop better interventions for preventing or reducing overconsumption. We aimed to determine which brain regions are concurrently activated in children/adolescents in response to viewing food pictures, and how these relate to adult findings. Two activation likelihood estimation (ALE) meta-analyses were performed: one with studies in normal weight children/adolescents (aged 8-18, 8 studies, 137 foci) and one with studies in normal weight adults (aged 18-45, 16 studies, 178 foci). A contrast analysis was performed for children/adolescents vs. adults. In children/adolescents, the most concurrent clusters were in the left lateral orbitofrontal cortex (OFC), the bilateral fusiform gyrus, and the right superior parietal lobule. In adults, clusters in similar areas were found. Although the number of studies for a direct statistical comparison between the groups was relatively low, there were indications that children/adolescents may not activate areas important for cognitive control. Overall, the number of studies that contributed to the significant clusters was moderate (6-75{\%}). In summary, the brain areas most consistently activated in children/adolescents by food viewing are part of the appetitive brain network and overlap with those found in adults. However, the age range of the children studied was rather broad. This study offers important recommendations for future research; studies making a direct comparison between adults and children in a sufficiently narrow age range would further elucidate how neural responses to food cues change during development.",
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What you see is what you eat : an ALE meta-analysis of the neural correlates of food viewing in children and adolescents. / van Meer, Floor; van der Laan, Laura N; Adan, Roger A H; Viergever, Max A; Smeets, Paul A M.

In: Neuroimage, Vol. 104, 01.01.2015, p. 35-43.

Research output: Contribution to journalReview articleScientificpeer-review

TY - JOUR

T1 - What you see is what you eat

T2 - an ALE meta-analysis of the neural correlates of food viewing in children and adolescents

AU - van Meer, Floor

AU - van der Laan, Laura N

AU - Adan, Roger A H

AU - Viergever, Max A

AU - Smeets, Paul A M

N1 - Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

PY - 2015/1/1

Y1 - 2015/1/1

N2 - Food cues are omnipresent and may enhance overconsumption. In the last two decades the prevalence of childhood obesity has increased dramatically all over the world, largely due to overconsumption. Understanding children's neural responses to food may help to develop better interventions for preventing or reducing overconsumption. We aimed to determine which brain regions are concurrently activated in children/adolescents in response to viewing food pictures, and how these relate to adult findings. Two activation likelihood estimation (ALE) meta-analyses were performed: one with studies in normal weight children/adolescents (aged 8-18, 8 studies, 137 foci) and one with studies in normal weight adults (aged 18-45, 16 studies, 178 foci). A contrast analysis was performed for children/adolescents vs. adults. In children/adolescents, the most concurrent clusters were in the left lateral orbitofrontal cortex (OFC), the bilateral fusiform gyrus, and the right superior parietal lobule. In adults, clusters in similar areas were found. Although the number of studies for a direct statistical comparison between the groups was relatively low, there were indications that children/adolescents may not activate areas important for cognitive control. Overall, the number of studies that contributed to the significant clusters was moderate (6-75%). In summary, the brain areas most consistently activated in children/adolescents by food viewing are part of the appetitive brain network and overlap with those found in adults. However, the age range of the children studied was rather broad. This study offers important recommendations for future research; studies making a direct comparison between adults and children in a sufficiently narrow age range would further elucidate how neural responses to food cues change during development.

AB - Food cues are omnipresent and may enhance overconsumption. In the last two decades the prevalence of childhood obesity has increased dramatically all over the world, largely due to overconsumption. Understanding children's neural responses to food may help to develop better interventions for preventing or reducing overconsumption. We aimed to determine which brain regions are concurrently activated in children/adolescents in response to viewing food pictures, and how these relate to adult findings. Two activation likelihood estimation (ALE) meta-analyses were performed: one with studies in normal weight children/adolescents (aged 8-18, 8 studies, 137 foci) and one with studies in normal weight adults (aged 18-45, 16 studies, 178 foci). A contrast analysis was performed for children/adolescents vs. adults. In children/adolescents, the most concurrent clusters were in the left lateral orbitofrontal cortex (OFC), the bilateral fusiform gyrus, and the right superior parietal lobule. In adults, clusters in similar areas were found. Although the number of studies for a direct statistical comparison between the groups was relatively low, there were indications that children/adolescents may not activate areas important for cognitive control. Overall, the number of studies that contributed to the significant clusters was moderate (6-75%). In summary, the brain areas most consistently activated in children/adolescents by food viewing are part of the appetitive brain network and overlap with those found in adults. However, the age range of the children studied was rather broad. This study offers important recommendations for future research; studies making a direct comparison between adults and children in a sufficiently narrow age range would further elucidate how neural responses to food cues change during development.

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KW - Brain Mapping

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KW - Cues

KW - Feeding Behavior/physiology

KW - Female

KW - Food

KW - Humans

KW - Male

KW - Middle Aged

KW - Photic Stimulation

KW - Prefrontal Cortex/physiology

KW - Young Adult

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DO - 10.1016/j.neuroimage.2014.09.069

M3 - Review article

C2 - 25285373

VL - 104

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JO - Neuroimage

JF - Neuroimage

SN - 1053-8119

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