What young and old can learn from each other: Cross-fertilisation between existing human rights law for children and developing human rights law for older persons

A.K. Habbig, A. Hoefmans, Paul de Hert

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapterScientificpeer-review

Abstract

Children’s rights law is often studied and perceived in isolation from the broader field of human rights law. This contribution explores the inter-relationship between children’s rights law and human rights law on older persons in order to see whether elements from each could successfully inform the other. Children’s rights law has a number of distinctive characteristics, such as the emphasis on the ‘best interests of the child’, the use of general principles, and the inclusion of ‘third parties’ (e.g. parents and other care-takers) in treaty provisions. In this contribution we ask two questions: whether these features could be a source of inspiration for elderly human rights law? And Whether children’s rights law could draw inspiration from developments with regard to the rights of older persons?
Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationChildren’s Rights Law in the Global Human Rights Landscape: Isolation, Inspiration, Integration?
EditorsE. Brems, E. Desmet, W. Vandenhole
PublisherRoutledge
Pages146-170
Number of pages25
ISBN (Electronic)9781317268055
ISBN (Print)9781138639010
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2017

    Fingerprint

Cite this

Habbig, A. K., Hoefmans, A., & de Hert, P. (2017). What young and old can learn from each other: Cross-fertilisation between existing human rights law for children and developing human rights law for older persons. In E. Brems, E. Desmet, & W. Vandenhole (Eds.), Children’s Rights Law in the Global Human Rights Landscape: Isolation, Inspiration, Integration? (pp. 146-170). Routledge. https://doi.org/10.4324/9781315637440