What's in a p?

Reassessing best practices for reporting hypothesis- testing research

K. Meyer, Arjen van Witteloostuijn, S. Beugelsdijk

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleScientificpeer-review

Abstract

Social science research has recently been subject to considerable criticism regarding the validity and power of empirical tests published in leading journals, and business scholarship is no exception. Transparency and replicability of empirical findings are essential to build a cumulative body of scholarly knowledge. Yet current practices are under increased scrutiny to achieve these objectives. JIBS is therefore discussing and revising its editorial practices to enhance the validity of empirical research. In this editorial, we reflect on best practices with respect to conducting, reporting, and discussing the results of quantitative hypothesis-testing research, and we develop guidelines for authors to enhance the rigor of their empirical work. This will not only help readers to assess empirical evidence comprehensively, but also enable subsequent research to build a cumulative body of empirical knowledge.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)535-551
JournalJournal of International Business Studies (JIBS)
Volume48
Issue number5
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jul 2017

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Testing
Social sciences
Transparency
Best practice
Hypothesis testing
Industry
Empirical research
Body of knowledge
Empirical test
Criticism
Empirical evidence

Keywords

  • hypothesis testing
  • statistical reporting
  • research malpractices
  • p value
  • new guidelines

Cite this

Meyer, K. ; van Witteloostuijn, Arjen ; Beugelsdijk, S. / What's in a p? Reassessing best practices for reporting hypothesis- testing research. In: Journal of International Business Studies (JIBS). 2017 ; Vol. 48, No. 5. pp. 535-551.
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What's in a p? Reassessing best practices for reporting hypothesis- testing research. / Meyer, K.; van Witteloostuijn, Arjen; Beugelsdijk, S.

In: Journal of International Business Studies (JIBS), Vol. 48, No. 5, 07.2017, p. 535-551.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleScientificpeer-review

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