When do bundles of high performance work systems reduce employee absenteeism? The moderating role of workload

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleScientificpeer-review

Abstract

Although Human Resource Management (HRM) scholars have frequently called for a more contextualized approach to HRM, there is still a limited understanding of how the HRM-employee outcome relationship varies under different conditions. This study tests a model that positions workload as a moderator of the relationship between perceived skill-, motivation- and opportunity-enhancing High Performance Work Systems (HPWS) and employee absenteeism. Using data from 194 employees, the results revealed that under high workloads, perceived opportunity-enhancing HPWS practices reduce absenteeism. However, workload did not influence the relationship between skill-enhancing and motivation-enhancing HPWS and absenteeism. The findings highlight that demanding work conditions in the form of a high workload can alter the relationship between HRM and key employee outcomes in such a way that the benefits of some HR practices become particularly useful when employees really need them. In addition, the findings underline the need to focus on the differential effects of skill-, motivation- and opportunity-enhancing HPWS practices for a richer understanding of the HRM–employee outcome relationship.
Original languageEnglish
Number of pages21
JournalInternational Journal of Human Resource Management
DOIs
Publication statusAccepted/In press - 2019

Fingerprint

Human resource management
Personnel
Moderators
Absenteeism
High performance work systems
Employees
Workload
Systems practice

Keywords

  • ATTITUDES
  • COMMITMENT
  • CONSERVATION
  • HPWS
  • HR PRACTICES
  • HUMAN-RESOURCE MANAGEMENT
  • IMPACT
  • JOB DEMANDS
  • MODEL
  • PERCEPTIONS
  • TURNOVER
  • ability
  • absenteeism
  • and opportunity-enhancing HPWS bundles
  • contingency approach
  • motivation
  • workload

Cite this

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title = "When do bundles of high performance work systems reduce employee absenteeism?: The moderating role of workload",
abstract = "Although Human Resource Management (HRM) scholars have frequently called for a more contextualized approach to HRM, there is still a limited understanding of how the HRM-employee outcome relationship varies under different conditions. This study tests a model that positions workload as a moderator of the relationship between perceived skill-, motivation- and opportunity-enhancing High Performance Work Systems (HPWS) and employee absenteeism. Using data from 194 employees, the results revealed that under high workloads, perceived opportunity-enhancing HPWS practices reduce absenteeism. However, workload did not influence the relationship between skill-enhancing and motivation-enhancing HPWS and absenteeism. The findings highlight that demanding work conditions in the form of a high workload can alter the relationship between HRM and key employee outcomes in such a way that the benefits of some HR practices become particularly useful when employees really need them. In addition, the findings underline the need to focus on the differential effects of skill-, motivation- and opportunity-enhancing HPWS practices for a richer understanding of the HRM–employee outcome relationship.",
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