When females trade grooming for grooming: Testing partner control and partner choice models of cooperation in two primate species

C. Fruteau, S. Lemoine, E. Hellard, E.E.C. van Damme, R. Noe

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleScientificpeer-review

Abstract

We tested predictions following from the biological market paradigm using reciprocated grooming sessions among the adult females in a sooty mangabey, Cercocebus atys, group with 35 females (Ivory Coast) and in two groups of vervet monkeys, Chlorocebus aethiops (South Africa) with four and seven females, respectively. Closely ranked females often groomed frequently. The exchanges within such dyads were generally characterized by time matching, but the subordinates groomed for longer than their dominant partners. The reciprocal nature of over 90% of the grooming sessions allowed us to investigate ‘partner control’ strategies such as ‘parcelling’ and ‘raising the stakes’. Females of both species neither parcelled nor gradually invested more grooming in the course of sessions. Rather, the longer bouts of a grooming session were usually at the beginning of the session and the length of the first bout reliably predicted the length of the whole session for frequently grooming partners. Furthermore, we compared potential trust-building behaviour (or ‘strategies’) in frequent and infrequent grooming
partners. We found that infrequent groomers of both species showed no signs of trust building and that the first bout they invested in a grooming session did not predict the session length. We conclude that each female has a good knowledge of her value as a grooming partner within each dyad and knows how
much she has to invest to receive a satisfactory amount of grooming within the same session.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1223-1230
JournalAnimal Behaviour
Volume81
Issue number6
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2011

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title = "When females trade grooming for grooming: Testing partner control and partner choice models of cooperation in two primate species",
abstract = "We tested predictions following from the biological market paradigm using reciprocated grooming sessions among the adult females in a sooty mangabey, Cercocebus atys, group with 35 females (Ivory Coast) and in two groups of vervet monkeys, Chlorocebus aethiops (South Africa) with four and seven females, respectively. Closely ranked females often groomed frequently. The exchanges within such dyads were generally characterized by time matching, but the subordinates groomed for longer than their dominant partners. The reciprocal nature of over 90{\%} of the grooming sessions allowed us to investigate ‘partner control’ strategies such as ‘parcelling’ and ‘raising the stakes’. Females of both species neither parcelled nor gradually invested more grooming in the course of sessions. Rather, the longer bouts of a grooming session were usually at the beginning of the session and the length of the first bout reliably predicted the length of the whole session for frequently grooming partners. Furthermore, we compared potential trust-building behaviour (or ‘strategies’) in frequent and infrequent groomingpartners. We found that infrequent groomers of both species showed no signs of trust building and that the first bout they invested in a grooming session did not predict the session length. We conclude that each female has a good knowledge of her value as a grooming partner within each dyad and knows howmuch she has to invest to receive a satisfactory amount of grooming within the same session.",
author = "C. Fruteau and S. Lemoine and E. Hellard and {van Damme}, E.E.C. and R. Noe",
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When females trade grooming for grooming : Testing partner control and partner choice models of cooperation in two primate species. / Fruteau, C.; Lemoine, S.; Hellard, E.; van Damme, E.E.C.; Noe, R.

In: Animal Behaviour, Vol. 81, No. 6, 2011, p. 1223-1230.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleScientificpeer-review

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