Who is prejudiced, and towards whom? The Big Five traits and generalized prejudice

J.T. Crawford, M.J. Brandt

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleScientificpeer-review

Abstract

Meta-analyses show that low levels of Openness and Agreeableness correlate with generalized prejudice. However, previous studies narrowly assessed prejudice toward low status, disadvantaged groups. Using a broad perationalization of generalized prejudice towards a heterogeneous array of targets, we sought to answer two questions: a) Are some types of people
prejudiced against most types of groups, and b) Are some types of people prejudiced against certain types of groups? Across four samples (N = 7,543), Openness was very weakly related to broad generalized prejudice, r = -.03, 95%CI [-.07, -.001], whereas low Agreeableness was reliably associated with broad generalized prejudice (r = -.23, 95%CI [-.31, -.16]). When target characteristics moderated relationships between Big Five traits and prejudice, they implied that
perceiver-target dissimilarity on personality traits explain prejudice. mportantly, the relationship between Agreeableness and prejudice remained robust across target groups, suggesting it is the personality trait orienting people toward (dis)liking of others.
Keywords: Big Five; Agreeableness; Openness; prejudice; generalized prejudice
Original languageEnglish
JournalPersonality and Social Psychology Bulletin
DOIs
Publication statusAccepted/In press - 2019

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abstract = "Meta-analyses show that low levels of Openness and Agreeableness correlate with generalized prejudice. However, previous studies narrowly assessed prejudice toward low status, disadvantaged groups. Using a broad perationalization of generalized prejudice towards a heterogeneous array of targets, we sought to answer two questions: a) Are some types of peopleprejudiced against most types of groups, and b) Are some types of people prejudiced against certain types of groups? Across four samples (N = 7,543), Openness was very weakly related to broad generalized prejudice, r = -.03, 95{\%}CI [-.07, -.001], whereas low Agreeableness was reliably associated with broad generalized prejudice (r = -.23, 95{\%}CI [-.31, -.16]). When target characteristics moderated relationships between Big Five traits and prejudice, they implied thatperceiver-target dissimilarity on personality traits explain prejudice. mportantly, the relationship between Agreeableness and prejudice remained robust across target groups, suggesting it is the personality trait orienting people toward (dis)liking of others. Keywords: Big Five; Agreeableness; Openness; prejudice; generalized prejudice",
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Who is prejudiced, and towards whom? The Big Five traits and generalized prejudice. / Crawford, J.T.; Brandt, M.J.

In: Personality and Social Psychology Bulletin, 2019.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleScientificpeer-review

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AU - Brandt, M.J.

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AB - Meta-analyses show that low levels of Openness and Agreeableness correlate with generalized prejudice. However, previous studies narrowly assessed prejudice toward low status, disadvantaged groups. Using a broad perationalization of generalized prejudice towards a heterogeneous array of targets, we sought to answer two questions: a) Are some types of peopleprejudiced against most types of groups, and b) Are some types of people prejudiced against certain types of groups? Across four samples (N = 7,543), Openness was very weakly related to broad generalized prejudice, r = -.03, 95%CI [-.07, -.001], whereas low Agreeableness was reliably associated with broad generalized prejudice (r = -.23, 95%CI [-.31, -.16]). When target characteristics moderated relationships between Big Five traits and prejudice, they implied thatperceiver-target dissimilarity on personality traits explain prejudice. mportantly, the relationship between Agreeableness and prejudice remained robust across target groups, suggesting it is the personality trait orienting people toward (dis)liking of others. Keywords: Big Five; Agreeableness; Openness; prejudice; generalized prejudice

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