Why not model spoken word recognition instead of phoneme monitoring?

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Abstract

Norris, McQueen & Cutler present a detailed account of the decision stage of the phoneme monitoring task. However, we question whether this contributes to our understanding of the speech recognition process itself, and we fail to see why phonotactic knowledge is playing a role in phoneme recognition.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)349-350
JournalBehavioral and Brain Sciences
Volume23
Issue number3
Publication statusPublished - 2000

Cite this

@article{adcadaefbfbc4ec5bbe47c72d2347966,
title = "Why not model spoken word recognition instead of phoneme monitoring?",
abstract = "Norris, McQueen & Cutler present a detailed account of the decision stage of the phoneme monitoring task. However, we question whether this contributes to our understanding of the speech recognition process itself, and we fail to see why phonotactic knowledge is playing a role in phoneme recognition.",
author = "J. Vroomen and {de Gelder}, B.",
year = "2000",
language = "English",
volume = "23",
pages = "349--350",
journal = "Behavioral and Brain Sciences",
issn = "0140-525X",
publisher = "CAMBRIDGE UNIV PRESS",
number = "3",

}

Why not model spoken word recognition instead of phoneme monitoring? / Vroomen, J.; de Gelder, B.

In: Behavioral and Brain Sciences, Vol. 23, No. 3, 2000, p. 349-350.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleScientificpeer-review

TY - JOUR

T1 - Why not model spoken word recognition instead of phoneme monitoring?

AU - Vroomen, J.

AU - de Gelder, B.

PY - 2000

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N2 - Norris, McQueen & Cutler present a detailed account of the decision stage of the phoneme monitoring task. However, we question whether this contributes to our understanding of the speech recognition process itself, and we fail to see why phonotactic knowledge is playing a role in phoneme recognition.

AB - Norris, McQueen & Cutler present a detailed account of the decision stage of the phoneme monitoring task. However, we question whether this contributes to our understanding of the speech recognition process itself, and we fail to see why phonotactic knowledge is playing a role in phoneme recognition.

M3 - Article

VL - 23

SP - 349

EP - 350

JO - Behavioral and Brain Sciences

JF - Behavioral and Brain Sciences

SN - 0140-525X

IS - 3

ER -