Wolves not welcome? Zoning for large carnivore conservation and management under the Bern Convention and EU Habitats Directive

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticleScientificpeer-review

    2 Citations (Scopus)

    Abstract

    With some exceptions, populations of bears, wolves, lynx and other large carnivores are recovering across Europe. Zoning is one of the means available to public authorities to promote large carnivore conservation while minimizing conflicts with human interests. In principle, this can entail designating zones where large carnivore conservation is prioritized over conflicting human interests, but also zones where the population density of large carnivores is adjusted to human activities, including low‐density areas or exclusion zones. Zoning as a large carnivore conservation and management tool is explored here in light of two influential European legal instruments, the Bern Convention and the EU Habitats Directive. The article finds that, first, the various legal regimes that apply to large carnivores under these instruments in different parts of Europe by themselves provide for a distinct degree of high‐level zoning. Second, and importantly, the Convention and Directive determine the legal bandwidth within which domestic authorities can design and implement more specific (sub)national zoning regimes.
    Original languageEnglish
    Pages (from-to)306-319
    Number of pages14
    JournalReview of European, Comparative & International Environmental Law
    Volume27
    Issue number3
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - Nov 2018

    Keywords

    • Large carnivores
    • Zoning
    • Wildlife
    • Biodiversity
    • Law
    • Bern Convention
    • EU Habitats Directive
    • Wolf

    Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'Wolves not welcome? Zoning for large carnivore conservation and management under the Bern Convention and EU Habitats Directive'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

  • Cite this