You wouldn’t like me when I’m angry: A daily diary study of displaced online aggression in dual‐earner couples

Ivana Vranjes*, Elfi Baillien, Sara Erreygers, Heidi Vandebosch, Hans De Witte

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleScientificpeer-review

Abstract

Modern technologies can aid working processes as well as provide individuals with an opportunity to connect and form interpersonal relationships. However, they can also create a context for displaced aggression. In this study, we examine whether people experiencing work stressors may engage in online antisocial behavioral as a means of venting their negative emotions. Specifically, we investigate whether experiencing stressors at work fuels anger in the private context and whether this anger triggers subsequent displaced aggression in the form of antisocial online behavior (AOB) throughout the evening. Additionally, we examine the crossover of anger to AOB in couples in their private context. We conducted a diary study amongst 95 dual‐earner couples, twice a day, during five consecutive working days. Results confirmed that men’s daily work stressors spilled over to their private context in the form of anger after work and AOB throughout the evening. No crossover effects were found from their partner. For women, a crossover effect was found of their partner’s work stressors and anger on their own AOB. These results demonstrate gender differences in displaced online aggression.
Original languageEnglish
Number of pages29
JournalApplied Psychology: An International Review
DOIs
Publication statusE-pub ahead of print - 2020

Keywords

  • ANGER
  • COMPUTER-MEDIATED COMMUNICATION
  • CROSSOVER
  • EMOTIONS
  • FACE-TO-FACE
  • LINKING WORK
  • SPILLOVER
  • STRESS
  • WORKING LIFE
  • WORKPLACE

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